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Video Cameras

Modeled after a traditional 8mm video camera, the pint-sized Bee captures video at 640 x 4...

While once a standard, you'd be hard-pressed to find an 8mm film camera today outside of a second-hand shop or eBay. If still want the look of the vintage camera in your video, however, one company Fuuvi has created an alternative: the Fuuvi Bee. Modeled after a traditional 8 mm movie camera, the pint-sized Bee captures video at 640 x 480 pixels and 30fps, with the ability to capture 100 minutes of video on a single charge.  Read More

Liquid Image has revealed two new action sport goggles with built-in camera, GPS and Wi-Fi...

In addition to taking the tiny ego HD action cam along to Las Vegas for this year's Consumer Electronics Show, Liquid Image has also revealed two new additions to its Xtreme Sport Cams product line. Both goggle cams feature built-in video, Wi-Fi and GPS and can be controlled via a smartphone app. The only appreciable difference between the Apex and Torque HD is that the former will undoubtedly find its way onto the piste whereas the latter is aimed directly at off-roaders.  Read More

Liquid Image has unveiled its tiny new HD actioncam, the EGO

Many readers will perhaps know Liquid Image for its HD Scuba Series dive masks, that feature a built-in video camera for recording hands-free underwater footage. The California-based company also makes ski and ATV goggles, which likewise capture the action from the shooter’s point of view. Recently, however, the designers at LI decided that they should also offer a camera that can be mounted on things like handlebars, roll bars, surfboards, or even a good ol’ tripod – so that “extreme videographers” can get shots of themselves, to add to their adrenaline-pumping masterpieces. The result is a tiny HD video camcorder appropriately enough named the EGO, and it was unveiled this week in Las Vegas at CES.  Read More

DJ Scratching Deck

Felis catus, the domestic cat. They've been our companions for thousands of years, but if you're a cat looking for some comfort, distraction or just some new playthings, there's never been a better time to be alive. We recently looked at some fun apps for your cat to play with on your iPad or tablet, but if you're not inclined to let your feline loose on an expensive piece of modern computing equipment, read on. Whether your furry fleabag is a pampered Persian or an ear bitten moggy, Gizmag's top 10 cat gadgets have been compiled with Puss's pleasure (and yours) in mind.  Read More

Aquabotix has rolled out a new underwater viewing system in the form of the iOS- and Andro...

Smartphones can already be used to remotely control a variety of vehicles, including flying toy helicopters and airplanes, or even starting your car. Now remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) can be added to the list with New England-based company Aquabotix rolling out its Hydroview vehicle. Equipped with LED lights and a HD video camera, the vehicle transmits a live video feed to an iOS- or Android-based smartphone, tablet, or a laptop and can be remotely operated by tilting the phone or tablet or via the laptop's touchpad.  Read More

The FourPro is a salt-tolerant underwater housing for the iPhone 4 and 4S, which allows th...

If nothing else, the iPhone 4’s ability to shoot 1080p high-def video has certainly done one thing – provided inventors with things to make. There is currently what could almost be described as a gold rush, as products are being designed to augment the smartphone’s camera, to the point that it could be used for all of the same things as traditional, stand-alone video cameras. Some of these innovations have included interchangeable lenses, a mini SteadiCam, and a rugged helmet-mount system. Now, an underwater housing system for the iPhone 4 and 4S is in the works, which will allow users to shoot undersea video at depths of up to 100 feet (30.5 meters).  Read More

Media Lab postdoctoral associate Andreas Velten explains how the camera works

We've been hearing about trillions in the news so much lately, it's easy to become desensitized to just what a colossal number that is. Recently, a team of brilliant researchers at MIT's Media Lab (ML) built an imaging system capable of making an exposure every picosecond- one trillionth of a second. Just how fast is that? Why, a thousand times faster than a nanosecond, of course. Put another way, one picosecond is to one second as one second is to about 31,700 years. That's fast. So fast, in fact, this system can literally slow down light itself and it does so in a manner unlike any other camera.  Read More

The mobislyder is a compact video camera sliding system, for use with smartphone cameras a...

I have to admit to occasionally doing something that’s perhaps a little dorky. If I’m listening to particularly moody music, I’ll sometimes close one eye, then simulate a tracking shot or a crane shot from a movie, by slowly moving my head past the items on my desk. Yeah, I look pretty dumb doing it, but the continuous change in perspective created by such a simple move really has a way of making even the most mundane scenes look ... poetic? Profound? Good videographers realize how powerful such shots can be, which is why some of them put their DSLRs or prosumer-level camcorders on camera sliding mechanisms like the Glidetrack. Now, users of smartphone cameras and pocket camcorders can get in on the smooth-tracking action, with Glidetrack’s compact new mobislyder.  Read More

Norwegian scientists are developing a capsule that they say will be able to transmit live ...

Although we may not yet have reached the stage where manned submarines can be shrunken down and placed inside the body, à la the movie Fantastic Voyage, current technology does allow us to do something almost as impressive – it is now possible to obtain images of the inside of the intestinal tract, by getting patients to swallow a camera-equipped capsule. Japanese company RF System Lab reported success using its Norika 3 RF Endoscopic Robot Capsule to transmit live video from inside test subjects back in 2004, while just last year Olympus announced the creation of a similar device. Now, Norwegian researchers are stating that they are in the process of developing the “next generation” of camera pill.  Read More

Philips has just announced the release of its new ESee pocket camcorder

As smartphones with built-in HD video cameras become increasingly commonplace, the stand-alone pocket camcorder looks like it could be on its way to obsolescence. That’s certainly what Cisco Systems seemed to think, at least, when it recently stopped production of the market-leading Flip camcorder. One company that apparently doesn’t share this viewpoint, however, is Philips – today, the electronics manufacturer announced its new ESee pocket video camera. While there’s certainly some overlap with many camera phones, the camcorder sports several features that might keep it from ending up in the bargain bin anytime soon.  Read More

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