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USB 3.0

SuperSpeed USB devices may have started to trickle onto the market, but it will still be a while before their use becomes widespread. That's simply because most people won't have the USB 3.0 ports required to take advantage of the speed boost the next generation offers. But StarTek.com come up with a low cost way to ensure your current laptop can enjoy the latest and greatest USB 3.0 devices - provided it has a spare ExpressCard 34 slot. Read More
Following the release of the first USB 3.0 Flash drive, full-sized external HDDs are now starting to appear with Buffalo just announced its first foray into this market. The DriveStation HD-HXU3 sports the latest high-speed interface, capable of transferring data at up to 625 MB per second - though Buffalo’s model can only hit 130 MB per second of this theoretical maximum - and likely to be a big hit with those that deal in large files such as HD video and images. Read More
USB 3.0 or SuperSpeed USB offers transfer speeds of up to ten times faster than the widely used Hi-Speed USB. Super Talent has announced the forthcoming availability of the first Flash drive to take advantage of these new speeds - the SuperSpeed USB 3.0 RAID Drive will be available in three capacity sizes and be backward compatible with earlier USB technologies. Read More
Asus has announced the world's first motherboard to support the upcoming USB 3.0 standard, allowing data transfer rates approaching 600MB/s. It also includes the latest generation SATA, which will support transfer speeds of up to 6Gbit/s, and the company has also flagged a cheaper alternative in the form of an add-in card that will offer these two functionalities for motherboards of the same family and will be sold for under US$30. Read More
Scheduled to hit the consumer market in 2010, USB 3.0 — also known as SuperSpeed USB — will deliver a tenfold improvement in data transfer rates while retaining backward compatibility with previous versions and adding new features that will make this communication standard all the more essential to the average consumer. But, speed aside, what changes is the next version of this popular standard going to bring? Read More
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