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University of Vienna

Science

Triple entanglement feat adds new twist to quantum cryptography

In the world of quantum mechanics, entanglement is a weird realm where particles that were once joined exhibit mirror-opposite reactions when separated, even when they are vast distances apart. Now researchers from the University of Vienna and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona have added a new twist to this phenomenon, by entangling three photons and adding a 3-D corkscrew motion to effectively allow multiple recipients to simultaneously receive information securely encoded in the one transmission.Read More

Space

Study sheds light on the feeding habits of young stars

According to new research, young stars may gain mass by consuming dense clumps of matter that may themselves have gone on to evolve into giant planets. The clumps are believed to be devoured by a star periodically, with intervals of several thousand years between "meals." During periods of brightness following the consumption of one of the cosmic clumps, astronomers estimate that a star could burn up the equivalent of the Earth's mass once every 10 days.Read More

Science

Researchers create 3D neuron imaging system

A team of researchers from the University of Vienna and MIT have developed a novel way of observing the behavior of neurons on a brain-wide scale. The discovery has potential applications in the medical field, allowing scientists to pinpoint the specific cells involved in a brain disorder, thus aiding them in tailoring a focused course of treatment.Read More

Science

Nanoparticles found to violate second law of thermodynamics

It may be a little late for April Fool's, but your skepticism is nonetheless warranted when reading that researchers have shown nanoparticles to disobey a fundamental law of physics which dictates the flow of entropy and heat in, it was believed, any situation. Specifically, researchers from three universities theoretically proposed then demonstrated that a nanoparticle in a state of thermal non-equilibrium does not always behave as larger particles might under the same conditions, with implications for various fields of research.Read More

Mobile Technology

University of Vienna app uses your phone for research while you sleep

Our mobile phones generally lie dormant while we're asleep, which means that millions of powerful processors are going unused for hours at a time. Samsung Austria and the University of Vienna's Faculty of Life Sciences have teamed up to try and tap the potential of all that unused processing power. Power Sleep is a new Android app that allows mobile phone users to donate the processing power of their devices to scientific research while they are asleep.Read More

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