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University of Stuttgart


— Automotive

Stuttgart students hit 100 km/h in 1.779 seconds to claim EV acceleration record

By - July 27, 2015 11 Pictures

The Tesla Model S might sprint to 100 km/h in an impressive 2.8 seconds, but it doesn't even come close to taking the record for the world's fastest accelerating electric car. A team of speedy Stuttgart University students has broken the record in a blistering 1.779 second run, beating the mark set by Swiss students late last year by just 0.006 of a second.

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— Science

"World's smallest propeller" may find use on nanobots

By - July 30, 2014 1 Picture
All over the world, scientists are creating microscopic "nanobots" for purposes such as delivering medication to precisely-targeted areas inside the body. In order for those tiny payload-carrying robots to get to their destination, however, they need some form of propulsion. Although some systems are already in development, a team of Israeli and German scientists may have come up with the most intriguing one yet, in the form of what they claim is the world's smallest propeller. Read More
— Robotics

Robots help create ultra-thin wooden exhibition hall

By - June 30, 2014 9 Pictures
The Landesgartenschau Exhibition Hall in Stuttgart, Germany, is claimed to be the first building to have its core structure made entirely from interlocking timber sections created by robots. Made up of over 240 individual segments of beech plywood created using a robotic fabrication method, the 17 meter (55 ft) tall, 245 square meter (2,637 sq ft) structure required just 12 cubic meters (424 cubic feet) of timber to construct. Read More
— Environment

Solspaces project to test year-round solar heating system

By - December 3, 2013 2 Pictures
Researchers at the University of Stuttgart are preparing to test a solar heating system capable of long term storage as part of "Solspaces," a three-year project that kicked off in March 2012. The heating concept uses a solar thermal system in conjunction with a sorption tank for storing heat from solar collectors throughout the warmer months that can then be released when the mercury drops. Read More
— Telecommunications

Record 40 Gbit/s wireless data transmission rate matches it with optical fiber

By - May 19, 2013 2 Pictures
If you thought 5G wireless was fast at one Gbit/s, how does 40 Gbit/s sound? That's the new wireless data transmission record set by a team of engineers in Germany using integrated solid state mm-wave transceivers. This data transmission rate was demonstrated over a distance of 1 km (0.6 miles) and it is hoped that such links could be used to close gaps between optical networks in rural areas at a fraction of the cost of installing optical fiber. Read More
— Architecture

SmartShell uses hydraulics, not bulk, for structural strength

By - April 20, 2012 4 Pictures
When things like bridges or stadium roofs are built, they’re designed to withstand not just the stress that they will experience on a frequent basis, but also the maximum stress loads that they’ll only be subjected to once in a while – these could take the form of things like snowfalls or wind storms. This means that much of the heavy, costly materials that the structures are made of will only occasionally prove necessary. Researchers from the University of Stuttgart, however, have come up with an alternative. They’ve designed a lightweight structure that actively adapts to increased loads via built-in hydraulics. Read More
— Science

Scientists create "the world's smallest steam engine"

By - December 15, 2011 1 Picture
It sounds implausible, yet scientists have managed to create a functioning engine, analogous to a Stirling engine, just three micrometers wide and made of a single particle. The minuscule engine was created by Clemens Bechinger and Valentin Blickle at the University of Stuttgart, and though it has its quirks, the pair have apparently demonstrated the engine's ability to do work. Read More
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