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University of Munich

Users of the NavVis mapping trolley don't have to hide from its cameras

When we first heard about the NavVis system a couple of years ago, it was being developed for indoor navigation. Developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich, it utilizes maps consisting of location-tagged photos of the hallways of buildings. In order to figure out where they are, users just take a photo of their surroundings using their smartphone, then the NavVis app matches that photo up with one in its map. Now, the technology has been expanded to the point that it could give Google Street View a run for its money.  Read More

BMW has provided 3D-printed thumb supports for some of its factory workers in a pilot proj...

3D printing has proved very useful in the health and medical sectors. The technology has been used to produce custom insoles, a mouthpiece for sleep apnea sufferers and even a replacement skull. Now, BMW has produced custom thumb orthoses for its factory workers to combat strained joints.  Read More

Researchers have discovered that the chemical AAQ temporarily restores some sight in blind...

Researchers have discovered a chemical that makes cells in the retinas of blind mice sensitive to light, temporarily restoring some vision. They are working on an improved compound that they hope could one day be used to restore sight in human patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, the most common form of inherited blindness, and macular degeneration, the most common cause of acquired blindness in the developed world.  Read More

A team of researchers have come up with a novel take on screen sharing inspired by traditi...

Researchers are investigating a means of virtually projecting images from handheld devices onto computer screens. Beyond simply being a means of screen sharing across devices, the research looks at traditional projection - physically shining a still or moving image onto a flat service - as a metaphor for multi-device interaction. In a video demo, researchers manipulate the "projected" image on the larger screen using iPhone accelerometer controls and gestures.  Read More

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