Advertisement

University of Leicester

Medical

Gamma camera sees skin, and what lies beneath

A new, portable imaging system could have a big impact on doctors' abilities to study patient tissue, both on a surface level, and further down. The technology combines optical and gamma imaging, and has already been successfully tested in a clinical pilot study.Read More

Science

Sniffing out the real-time chemical signature of ripening fruit

Using technology to sniff out food that's gone bad isn't a new idea – we've seen sensors that use carbon nanotubes to detect spoiled meat, and smart caps that can spot bad milk. Now, researchers in the United Kingdom have successfully identified the chemical signature of ripening mangoes. The findings could be extended to other fruit, and might one day revolutionize how everyone from farmers to supermarket workers tell if their fruit is ready.Read More

Medical

Compound reverses symptoms of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's in fruit flies

Neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's are extremely widespread, affecting millions of people across the planet, but treatments are limited, and there's currently no cure available. New work is showing promise in the development of a new treatment, with scientists identifying a compound that can reverse symptoms of the diseases. The method hasn't been tested on human patients just yet, but it's been found to be effective in genetically modified fruit flies.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Dangerous bacteria molecules discovered in processed foods

Everyone knows that processed foods aren't exactly good for the human body, but a new study by researchers at the University of Leicester has shed more light on exactly why that's the case. The scientists have detected dangerous molecules called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are linked to numerous conditions, including Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps most interestingly, it is believed that the dangerous molecules could potentially be removed without impacting cost or taste.Read More

Space

New study finds common link between young stars and black holes

A research project led by the University of Leicester in the UK has identified similarities in the readings from the discs surrounding black holes and young stars, even though the objects have wildly different properties. The discovery was made by studying the brightness variations produced by accretion discs around various astronomical objects. These huge discs of matter play a central part in the growth of most objects in the Universe, providing a common ground for study. Read More

Biology

Putting a price tag on brainpower

If you offer someone "a penny for their thoughts," how good a deal might you be getting? A study conducted at the University of Leicester has sought to shed some light on the value of our brainpower, finding a single penny to be worth to precisely three hours, seven minutes and 30 seconds worth of thinking.Read More

Medical

Promising lung cancer breath test device moves into clinical trials

The developers of a promising new lung cancer detection instrument have announced they are now moving their device into clinical trials. By relying on breath tests as a means of diagnosing the disease, it is hoped that the device could a non-invasive method for earlier detection and ultimately boost lung cancer survival rates.Read More

Good Thinking

New maritime monitoring system would draw on existing satellites

According to a scientist from the University of Leicester in the UK, the search for missing ships and sea-crossing aircraft – such as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – would be much easier if existing satellites were simply used differently. Dr. Nigel Bannister is developing a system in which spacecraft that already keep an eye on the land could also turn their attention to the sea. Read More

Space

New initiative gives you the chance to name an exoplanet

The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the organization in charge of naming celestial objects, has set up a public contest that will let people all around the globe pick the names of 20 to 30 well-characterized exoplanets and their respective host stars by August next year.Read More

Good Thinking

"Magic" marker helps investigators in hunt for fingerprints

A "magic" marker pen developed at the University of Leicester enables forensic experts, police and criminal investigators to quickly determine whether a receipt potentially containing fingerprint deposits is made of thermal paper, with another device then used to reveal the presence of any fingerprints. The devices come thanks to the work of the suitably-named Dr Bond, John Bond, from the University's Department of Criminology.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning