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University of Edinburgh

— Science

Naturally-occurring protein has melting ice cream problem licked

There are few things that go as well together as an ice cream cone and a hot summer's day, but it can be a race against the clock to get the sweet treat down before it turns into a sticky mess. Such disasters could become a thing of the past thanks to scientists in Scotland who have discovered a naturally-occurring protein that can be added to ice cream to make it melt more slowly.

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— Environment

Acidic oceans triggered mass extinction over 250 million years ago

In order to better understand how climate change will unfold over the coming decades, some scientists are looking to the remote past and specific climatic catastrophes to help shed light the so-called Anthropocene and its consequences for life on Earth. Recently, researchers at the University of Utah looked into the so-called Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum for clues. Now, a study by the University of Edinburgh highlights evidence that the rapid acidification of oceans 252 million years ago caused the greatest extinction of all time. Read More
— Space

Engine running on frozen carbon dioxide may power mission to Mars

Future missions to Mars may well be powered by carbon dioxide fueled engines, thanks to a recent prototype developed by Northumbria and Edinburgh Universities. Exploiting a phenomenon known as the Leidenfrost effect, researchers hope that their engine could be powered by the vast amount of dry-ice deposits found on the red planet, thereby reducing the need to transport fuel on interplanetary missions. Read More
— Medical

World-first regeneration of a living organ

It may not be to quite the same level achieved by Victor Frankenstein, but work by a team from the University of Edinburgh is likely to have significant real-world implications in the field of regenerative medicine. For the first time, the team has successfully regenerated a living organ in mice, not by using a jolt of electricity, but by manipulating DNA. Read More
— Robotics

Robot barman knows when you want a drink

Meet James. He’s a barman with a cheery disposition, is quick with your order, and doesn't tolerate queue jumping. He’s also a one-armed robot with a tablet for a head. But the really curious thing about James is that he can read your body language to find out whether or not you want to order a drink. Read More