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University of East Anglia


— Environment

European climate at mercy of retreating sea ice

By - June 30, 2015 1 Picture

An international team of scientists has found that retreating sea ice between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans is linked to weakened air-sea heat exchange in the region. This, it warns, could result in a cooler climate in western Europe and an altered or slower Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which would have knock-on effects for the Gulf Stream and consequently for the atmosphere.

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— Science

Disney tech may lead to better dubbing of foreign films

By - April 22, 2015 1 Picture
Here's something you might not know about foreign-language films ... when they're dubbed to English, the editors don't necessarily just go with the most literal translation. Instead, they observe the actors' lip movements, then choose English dialogue that at least somewhat matches up with those. Now, a team from Disney Research Pittsburgh and the University of East Anglia has developed a system that does so automatically, and that offers a wider range of suggested alternate phrases. Read More

Eyeteq is claimed to improve TV viewing for the colorblind

There may soon be help for red-green colorblind TV viewers. University of East Anglia spinoff company Spectral Edge has announced its Eyeteq system, which reportedly "allows color-blind viewers to better differentiate between red and green when watching programs, allowing them to see details they previously could not." Read More
— Science

Genetically-modified fruit flies could control wild populations by producing only sons

By - August 13, 2014 2 Pictures
Mediterranean fruit flies are responsible for extensive damage to fruit and vegetable crops, not only in the Mediterranean region but also in Australia, North and South America. While existing methods of controlling them include the use of insecticides and sterilization, the University of East Anglia and biotech company Oxitec are pioneering what they claim is a greener and less expensive approach – they're genetically modifying male fruit flies to produce only male viable offspring. Read More
— Medical

Achilles' heel to lower defenses of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found

By - June 20, 2014 1 Picture
The discovery of antibiotics is one of the most important breakthroughs of the 20th century. But their effectiveness and low cost has led to their overuse, resulting in the worrying rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, or so-called superbugs. Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UAE) in England have now uncovered an Achille's heel in the bacterial cell defenses that could mean that bacteria wouldn't develop drug-resistance in the first place. Read More
— Environment

Researchers bring extensive world temperature records to Google Earth

By - February 6, 2014 4 Pictures
Talking about the weather is a pastime as old as language, but climate researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK have just given people a whole lot more to talk about. As part of an ongoing effort to increase the accessibility and transparency of data on past climate and climate change, they've made one of the most widely used records of Earth's climate accessible through Google Earth. Read More
— Science

Prototype device detects drug use via fingerprints

By - November 10, 2011 1 Picture
Fingerprints have been used to confirm or determine peoples' identities for over one hundred years now, but new technology is allowing them to be put to another use - drug testing. Intelligent Fingerprinting (a spin-off company affiliated with the UK's University of East Anglia) has just unveiled a prototype portable device that can detect the presence of illicit drugs or other substances in a person's system by analyzing the sweat in their fingerprints. Read More
— Electronics

Breakthrough in development of bio-batteries

By - May 26, 2011 2 Pictures
The development of practical microbial fuel cells took a big step forward this week. Research conducted by a team of scientists from England’s University of East Anglia was published on Monday (May 23), in which they revealed that they had discovered “the exact molecular structure of the proteins which enable bacterial cells to transfer electrical charge.” Scientists possessing this knowledge can now start working on technology for tethering bacteria directly to electrodes, which could lead to much more efficient microbial fuel cells – also known as bio-batteries. Read More
— Environment

Climate Change “only one symptom of a stressed Planet Earth” says IGBP

By - February 8, 2007 1 Picture
February 9, 2007 In releasing its latest comprehensive report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) focuses an important spotlight on the current state of the Earth’s climate. Climate change is just one of the many symptoms exhibited by a planet under pressure from human activities. "Global environmental change, which includes climate change, threatens to irreversibly alter our planet," says Kevin Noone, Executive Director of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP).Global studies by International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) show that human-driven environmental changes are affecting many parts of the Earth’s system, in addition to its climate. For example, half of Earth’s land surface is now domesticated for direct human use, 75 percent of the world’s fisheries are fully or over-exploited, and the composition of today’s atmosphere is well outside the range of natural variability the Earth has maintained over the last 650,000 years. The report concludes that Earth is now in the midst of its sixth great extinction event. And the remarkable image comes from NASA’s Visible Earth catalog – it’s a composite of Earth’s city lights. Read More
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