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University of Dundee

Materials

Naturally-occurring protein has melting ice cream problem licked

There are few things that go as well together as an ice cream cone and a hot summer's day, but it can be a race against the clock to get the sweet treat down before it turns into a sticky mess. Such disasters could become a thing of the past thanks to scientists in Scotland who have discovered a naturally-occurring protein that can be added to ice cream to make it melt more slowly.Read More

Science

Levitated lab-grown cartilage could result in more effective implants

Although it's now possible to create lab-grown cartilage, there's still at least one big challenge in doing so – cartilage grown in a flat Petri dish may not be optimally-shaped for replacing the body's own natural cartilage parts. Scientists from a consortium of UK universities, however, are developing a possible solution. They're using "ultrasonic tweezers" to grow cartilage in mid-air. Read More

Science

Acoustic tractor beam pulls in macroscopic objects

The tractor beam is a staple of science fiction. Aliens use them to haul up unwilling earthlings onto flying saucers, and spacecraft use them to seize enemy ships or tow captured objects around in space. Now a group of researchers working at the University of Dundee actually claim to have built one. But instead of lasers, it uses ultrasonic waves to pull macroscopic objects in.Read More

Medical

Dr. Who's sonic screwdriver a step closer to reality?

A University of Dundee research team led by Prof. Mike MacDonald has demonstrated that both levitation and twisting forces can be applied to an object by application of ultrasonic beams. This latest breakthrough is part of a wide-ranging U.K. research effort to develop a device not unlike the "sonic screwdriver" made famous by the TV series Doctor Who. Read More

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