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University of Texas

Robotics

Harmony rehab robot guides recovery

Until now, rehabilitation exoskeletons have generally been one-armed, and haven't been of much help in providing the sort of two-arm training that many patients need to recover coordination for carrying out daily tasks. Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin have now developed Harmony, a two-armed, robotic exoskeleton that uses mechanical feedback and sensor data to provide therapy to patients with spinal and neurological injuries.Read More

Architecture

NexusHaus Solar Decathlon entry aims for increased water efficiency

There are still over six months to go until the next US Solar Decathlon, but competitors are already hard at work building their prototype sustainable home entries. The first to come to our attention is NexusHaus, a collaborative effort between the University of Texas at Austin and Munich's Technische Universität München that will run solely on solar power and focuses on water efficiency. Read More

Electronics

New RF circulator to run rings around old technology

In the world of electronic components, there are many devices out there that do their job well and reliably, but are almost never heard of – even though they may be vital to equipment that plays a role in our technology-driven lives. The radio frequency (RF) circulator is just such a device: it has simply done its job as a nondescript box of gubbins buried in radio communications systems, quietly directing radio frequency signals to the places they should go. Now researchers at the University of Texas have given the RF circulator a makeover. Not only is the new prototype smaller, lighter, and cheaper, it's also claimed to be easily adapted to different frequencies on the fly, which is something the old style circulator cannot do.Read More

Medical

New gene editing method corrects muscular dystrophy in mice

Researchers at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center have developed a technique that corrects a mutation leading to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The technique, called CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, removes the mutation entirely in mice, and could have far-reaching consequences in the treatment of muscular dystrophy in people.Read More

Science

Fly-inspired tech could find use in better hearing aids

When it comes to animals with good hearing, flies might not be the first one you'd think of. The Ormia ochracea fly, however, has a unique hearing mechanism that allows it to precisely determine the location of a cricket based on its chirps ... it then deposits its larvae on the cricket, which ultimately consume the poor insect. Scientists at the University of Texas Austin have now duplicated that mechanism, with hopes that it could find use in applications such as next-generation hearing aids. Read More

Science

Shape-changing implantable transistors grip living tissue

A multinational group of scientists has developed implantable shape-changing transistors that can grip nerves, blood vessels and tissues. According to the researchers, these soft electronic devices can change shape within the body, while still maintaining their electronic properties, allowing them to be used in a variety of applications and treatments.Read More

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