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UCSD


— Medical

Mouth guard could continuously monitor diabetes, and more

By - September 1, 2015

We've already heard about an electronics-packing mouthguard that can be used to detect serious impacts to the head. Now, scientists at the University of California, San Diego have developed one that could provide continuous readings of users' health markers including lactate, cortisol and uric acid. It may be used to monitor the well-being of people such as diabetics, to track the performance of athletes, or to detect stress in soldiers.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Software objectively assesses children's pain levels

By - June 2, 2015

It's important to know how much pain young hospital patients are experiencing, and not just because no one wants them to suffer – additionally, excessive pain can indicate problems that need addressing. That's why scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have developed facial pattern recognition software that objectively assesses children's pain levels based on consistent indicators.

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— Environment

Nanoparticle-based material turns up the heat on concentrated solar power

By - November 2, 2014 2 Pictures
The key factor when it comes to solar power plant efficiency – be they of the photovoltaic or concentrated solar power variety – is the amount of light that can be captured by the light-absorbing material and converted into electricity or heat. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a new nanoparticle-based material that promises to improve the efficiency of CSP plants with its ability to absorb and convert over 90 percent of the sunlight it captures into heat. Read More
— Electronics

Temporary tattoo lactate sensor converted into sweat-powered biobattery

By - August 14, 2014
Last year, researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) unveiled a sensor imprinted on a temporary tattoo that, when applied to the skin, is able to continuously monitor lactate levels in a person's sweat as they exercise. Now the research team has leveraged the technology to create a biobattery powered by perspiration that could lead to small electronic devices being powered by sweat. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Gold nanoparticles may be used to melt away fat

By - June 20, 2014
Liposuction may be a popular method of instant body fat reduction, but it certainly isn't perfect. Patients can experience bruising, there can be lumps that have to be addressed with a second procedure, plus things other than fat cells – such as connective tissue and nerves – can inadvertently also get removed. Two researchers, however, are developing what could be a better form of liposuction, that involves first using injected gold microparticles to melt the fat. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

ParentGuardian helps parents of ADHD kids keep their stress in check

By - June 4, 2014 2 Pictures
It can be hard enough for parents to maintain a cool head when dealing with an angry child at the best of times, but things can get much more difficult when that child has ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). That's why scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have created ParentGuardian. It combines a wrist-worn sensor and an app, to monitor parents' stress levels and deliver real-time coping strategies. Read More
— Science

Plant-based magnetic microswimmers to deliver drugs more precisely

By - December 23, 2013 2 Pictures
If you remember the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage, you'll recall how miniaturized government agents traveled through blood vessels in a tiny submarine, in their attempt remove a blood clot from a scientist's brain. Synthetic nanomotors that can do the same job have been the subject of numerous research efforts and now University of California, San Diego (UCSD) researchers report that they've created powerful biodegradable "microswimmers" that can deliver drugs more precisely, derived from common plants like passion fruit and wild banana. Read More
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