Advertisement

Traumatic Brain Injury

Health & Wellbeing

Blood test detects concussion up to a week after impact

A visibly shaken or unconscious athlete can be a pretty clear indication of concussion following a knock to the head. Milder concussions can be much harder to detect, but that doesn't necessarily make them any less of a threat to long term health. Researchers have now devised a blood test that can detect these kinds of concussions up to seven days after the incident, promising another way for doctors to manage the risks of injury to the brain.Read More

Wearables

Samsung's brainBAND to further understanding of concussion

Picking up on the symptoms of concussion can be tricky business at the time of the incident, and measuring its effects thereafter aren't so straightforward either. Looking to further our understanding of brain injuries and how they can be managed to avoid long-term harm, Samsung has developed an experimental brainBAND to quantify the force of impacts to the head.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Eye movement monitor screens for concussion in 60 seconds

Concussions are serious business, and people suffering from them should get medical attention as soon as possible. Unfortunately, however, they're often difficult for coaches on the sidelines of playing fields to diagnose. That's where Boston-based SyncThink's Eye-Sync system comes in. By tracking athletes' eye movements, it can reportedly tell if they're concussed in just one minute.Read More

Sports

Neck band made to protect the brain

When we think about avoiding concussions, we tend to think of helmets. The problem is, concussions are typically caused by the brain suddenly "sloshing" within the skull, knocking itself against the inside of the cranium. Helmets help reduce the likelihood of that happening by absorbing impact energy, but they're not 100 percent effective – that's why concussions can sometimes occur even without a hit being delivered directly to the head. Help may be on the way, however, in the form of a simple neck band.Read More

Sports

Next-gen football helmet blunts impulse and impact

University of Michigan researchers have entered the race to build a lightweight, more affordable and more effective football helmet, with a system they've called Mitigatium. The design incorporates three different layers that are meant to blunt some dangerous physics that today's helmet designs ignore.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Helmet decal could reduce athletes' brain injuries

If we lived in a world where athletes only received straight-on blows to the head, then regular helmets would offer all the protection needed. In real life, however, helmets usually receive impacts at an angle, with the resulting twisting of the head potentially causing brain injuries to the wearer. Now, scientists from Vancouver's Simon Fraser University have developed something to help keep that from happening – a sticker called the BrainShield.Read More

Medical

Xenon could provide protection for the brain after a blow to the head

Injuries from a blow to the head are a two-stage affair, with the primary injury caused by the initial impact being followed by a secondary injury that develops in the subsequent hours and days. We have seen the development of devices like the Jolt Sensor that are designed to detect the severity of the initial impact, but there is currently no drug treatment for the secondary injury, which is largely responsible for a patient sustaining mental and physical disabilities. Now scientists at Imperial College London have found that xenon gas shows promise as such a treatment.Read More

Sports

Clip-on Jolt Sensor vibrates when there's a risk of concussion

Heightened awareness of brain injuries and their enduring impacts has seen emphasis grow on immediate concussion testing. Indeed, if some time passes before detection, an additional blow to the already injured brain can have serious consequences. The team behind the Jolt Sensor is looking to make these assessments an instantaneous affair, with a sensor that clips onto an athlete's headwear and vibrates when they receive too heavy a knock. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Blood test determines severity of concussions

It wasn't so long ago that shaking off a knock to the head and getting back on the field was seen as a sign of toughness for sportspeople. But in recent years, increased awareness of the potential for long-term damage has put the seriousness of concussion in the spotlight. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden have now developed a blood test that reveals the severity of a concussion and when it is safe for a player to return to the game.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning

    Advertisement