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Trauma

— Medical

Flipping the switch on cell conversion could better repair damaged hearts

By - October 16, 2014 1 Picture
One complication that can arise from a heart attack is the formation of scar tissue, which can the harden organ's walls and impede its ability to pump blood. This is caused by fibroblast cells which move to replace damaged muscle with the scar tissue. New research conducted at the University of North Carolina's (UNC) School of Medicine suggests these cells could be converted to endothelial cells which actually assist in recovery, potentially minimizing the damage caused during a heart attack. Read More
— Medical

Xenon could provide protection for the brain after a blow to the head

By - September 9, 2014 1 Picture
Injuries from a blow to the head are a two-stage affair, with the primary injury caused by the initial impact being followed by a secondary injury that develops in the subsequent hours and days. We have seen the development of devices like the Jolt Sensor that are designed to detect the severity of the initial impact, but there is currently no drug treatment for the secondary injury, which is largely responsible for a patient sustaining mental and physical disabilities. Now scientists at Imperial College London have found that xenon gas shows promise as such a treatment. Read More
— Sports

Clip-on Jolt Sensor vibrates when there's a risk of concussion

By - September 4, 2014 4 Pictures
Heightened awareness of brain injuries and their enduring impacts has seen emphasis grow on immediate concussion testing. Indeed, if some time passes before detection, an additional blow to the already injured brain can have serious consequences. The team behind the Jolt Sensor is looking to make these assessments an instantaneous affair, with a sensor that clips onto an athlete's headwear and vibrates when they receive too heavy a knock. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Blood test determines severity of concussions

By - March 16, 2014 1 Picture
It wasn't so long ago that shaking off a knock to the head and getting back on the field was seen as a sign of toughness for sportspeople. But in recent years, increased awareness of the potential for long-term damage has put the seriousness of concussion in the spotlight. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden have now developed a blood test that reveals the severity of a concussion and when it is safe for a player to return to the game. Read More
— Games

Biofeedback-based horror game challenges players to deal with fear

By - November 17, 2013 32 Pictures
While traditional horror video games seek to provide an exciting thrill, Nevermind is a biofeedback-enhanced horror game that has greater ambitions. It requires you to manage your anxiety in alarming scenarios – the more stressed you feel, the harder the game becomes. The aim, says Erin Reynolds, its creator, is for players to learn how to not let their fears get the best of them in nerve-wracking situations and hopefully carry over their gameplay-acquired skills into the real world. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

VEPS sensor detects signs of traumatic brain injury before it's too late

By - June 25, 2013 9 Pictures
Victims of penetrating head injuries usually seek immediate attention, as the hole in their skull is difficult to miss. However, people with closed-head injuries may show few immediate signs of the trauma, and appropriate diagnostic equipment (primarily a CAT scanner) is often not immediately available. A Mexican-US team of researchers has now developed a simple, easy to operate, and inexpensive electromagnetic sensor for traumatic brain injuries, suited to on site use by field personnel and paramedics. Read More
— Medical

DARPA foam fights internal bleeding

By - December 11, 2012 2 Pictures
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is developing a foam that can be injected into the body cavities of battlefield wounded to protect them from internal abdominal bleeding. The agency hopes that when perfected, this polyurethane polymer foam will help the wounded to survive the critical minutes needed to transport them to proper surgical facilities for treatment. Read More
— Medical

US Army and National Football League team up to fight traumatic brain injury

By - July 20, 2012 1 Picture
The US Army is now working with the US National Football League (NFL) to develop ways to protect their respective members at risk of repeated incidents of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), traditionally called concussions. The first step of the program is to install sensors in the protective helmets so that the conditions leading to MTBI can be understood. Once understood, new helmet designs will provide more protection against such injuries. Read More

New technology shown to minimize brain injuries

When the brain receives a traumatic injury, irreversible damage occurs as the cells at the point of impact die. Injured cells surrounding the area then release toxic substances, which cause the brain to swell. This decreases blood flow within the brain, leading to lower oxygen levels, which in turn leads to more cell deaths. Recently, however, scientists from North Carolina’s Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have developed a new technique, that has greatly reduced the secondary cell deaths in brain-injured lab rats. Read More
— Medical

Non-surgical procedure repairs severed nerves in minutes

By - February 7, 2012 2 Pictures
Professor George Bittner and his colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin Center for Neuroscience have developed a simple and inexpensive procedure to quickly repair severed peripheral nerves. The team took advantage of a mechanism similar to that which permits many invertebrates to regenerate and repair nerve damage. The new procedure, based on timely application of common chemicals to the severed nerve ends, could help patients to recover nearly full function in days or weeks. Read More
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