Introducing the Gizmag Store

Trains

Kawasaki to build Japan's fastest train

Plans announced by Kawasaki Heavy Industries could see a new record set for high-speed train travel in Japan. The design for the rail vehicle dubbed the “Environmentally Friendly Super Express Train” (efSET) is expected to be completed by the end of 2009 and its promised operating speed has been pitched around the 217mph (350 kmh) mark, quicker than the fastest trains currently operating on the country's high-speed Shinkansen network which clock around 188mph (300kmh).  Read More

Maglev Train tops 500kmh

The Transrapid in Shanghai has set a new world for commercial railway systems of 501 kmh (311 mph). The maglev (magnetic levitation) train, which has no wheels, axels, engine or transmission, broke the 500 kmh mark on November 12 on the 30 km track between Long Yang Station and Pudong International Airport...  Read More

The latest Autotram prototype

December 2006 The concept of a dual-mode vehicle that will run on tram or train tracks and is also capable of driving on the road is gaining ground with the news that Japanese rail firm JR Hokkaido is poised to launch its dual-mode bus and rail vehicle we previewed two years ago. The company will begin conducting commercial tests in April 2007 and preliminary trials suggest the vehicle’s fuel cost is about a quarter of a diesel vehicle, and maintenance cost about one-eighth, while offering the flexibility to extend railed systems. Similarly, the European AutoTram concept is also gathering a following. The Autotram can be up to 36 meters long, can carry as many passengers as a streetcar while being as versatile as a bus. One of the key aspects of the Autotram is its flywheel energy storage system that facilitates a regenerative braking system and signficiantly cuts operating costs. The Bladerunner concept is another dual-mode transport system.  Read More

Japanese experiment with combination bus/train

Experiments in Japan with dual-mode vehicle (DMV) technology are yielding promising results. JR Hokkaido has been installing a dual wheel train-tyre system on microbuses so that they can be used as both road and light rail transport.The use of the vehicles on congestion-free railway tracks makes rail transport far more viable, with the cost of remodeling a microbus being approximately 10% ofthe cost for ordinary train cars and as weight is also around 10%, railway tracks require less maintenance. Commercial systems are planned for market by 2007.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 26,496 articles