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CreepyDOL is a new personal tracking system that allows a user to track, locate, and break...

Brendan O'Connor is an unabashed hacker who has worked for DARPA and taught at the US military's cybersecurity school. CreepyDOL (Creepy Distributed Object Locator), his new personal tracking system, allows a user to track, locate, and break into an individual's smartphone. "For a few hundred dollars," he says, "I can track your every movement, activity, and interaction, until I find whatever it takes to blackmail you."  Read More

Modern tech can help keep pets safe and healthy

Human beings aren’t the only ones donning ever-more powerful wearable electronic devices. Our four-legged friends have an increasing array of smart collars from which to choose. Two cases in point are the Whistle, an exercise tracker for your pooch, and Tagg, a GPS tracker designed to ensure your beloved pet doesn’t end up in the lost dogs’ home.  Read More

A new Wi-Fi-based 'Wi-Vi' system can track people moving behind walls (Image: Christine Da...

Researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed what could become low-cost, X-ray vision. The system, known as "Wi-Vi," is based on a concept similar to radar and sonar imaging, but rather than using high-power signals, this tech uses reflected Wi-Fi signals to track the movement of people behind walls and closed doors.  Read More

Tile is a new sensor tag for tracking objects

The market for devices with apps designed to track objects and recover lost items is expanding. A few days ago we reported on Button TrackR, which uses crowd-sourcing to find lost objects. New to the party is Tile, which adds an element of social networking to the mix by connecting to other mobile devices running Tile apps through Bluetooth, extending the search beyond the usual range limitations.  Read More

Button TrackR is a coin sized device to track objects via a smartphone app

Anyone with a propensity to misplace keys knows how irritating it is to look for them when you are running late. But help is at hand for those people with a Bluetooth-enabled smartphone that can connect to tracking devices such as Button TrackR, a coin-shaped little number currently fundraising on Indiegogo. One of the innovations that Button TrackR introduces to this growing market niche is crowd sourced tracking that helps extend the search party.  Read More

ESA’s Proba-V satellite pinpointed the location of aircraft in flight over the Atlantic ap...

When the ESA’s Proba-V was launched on May 7, its main mission was to map land cover and vegetation growth across the entire surface of the Earth every two days. But the miniaturized ESA satellite is also casting its gaze higher, to test whether it is possible to track aircraft continuously from space. Proba-V has now shown this is indeed possible, by becoming the first satellite to pick up aircraft tracking signals from space.  Read More

VANMOOF believes it's created a smarter commuter bike

In its mission to "shake the unshakeable," Dutch bike manufacturer VANMOOF has created what it calls the world's first intelligent commuter bike. The VANMOOF 10 Electrified combines GPS navigation, smart power control, and electric motivation underpinned by a lightweight battery pack.  Read More

Polar's new Stride Sensor tracks all kinds of running stats without GPS

Polar, the company responsible for all kinds of connected fitness products, has just launched a new device called the Stride Sensor. It's designed to allow runners to keep track of all kinds of key information about their workout, and it does so without requiring any GPS signal.  Read More

Lockheed Martin's ADAM laser system destroys a rocket mid-flight

Lockheed Martin has released a video of ADAM, its high energy laser (HEL) system, taking out a rocket from a range of 1.5 km (0.9 miles). Slowed down, the 300-fps video clearly shows the laser beam striking and tracking a point towards the front of the rocket, before destroying it mid-flight.  Read More

The ESA's Proba-V satellite (Image: ESA)

When it comes to keeping tabs on the location of aircraft, radar has long ruled the roost. But radar range is limited, and long-haul planes become untraceable when passing over oceans and large deserts or polar regions. By equipping orbiting satellites with instruments that listen in on ADS-B signals, scientists think that it should possible to track aircraft over the course of their entire journey, and with the launch of Proba-V, they're ready to put the idea to the test.  Read More

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