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— Sports

Tracky sportswear assesses your performance via built-in motion sensors

When professional athletes are having their performance analyzed, it's certainly not unheard of for them to wear motion capture suits while training in a lab environment. Coaches and others can then analyze their movements, to see where improvements could be made. Indian startup ProjectPOLE is now offering that same feedback to everyday athletes, with its Tracky motion-tracking sportswear. Read More
— Good Thinking

New maritime monitoring system would draw on existing satellites

According to a scientist from the University of Leicester in the UK, the search for missing ships and sea-crossing aircraft – such as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – would be much easier if existing satellites were simply used differently. Dr. Nigel Bannister is developing a system in which spacecraft that already keep an eye on the land could also turn their attention to the sea. Read More
— Science

Tiny injectable beeping tags used to track salmon

In order to study how young fish such as salmon are affected by swimming through hydroelectric dams, scientists have traditionally equipped them with surgically-implanted acoustic tracking tags. Unfortunately, the implantation procedure can harm the fish, plus the weight of the device can affect their behavior. Now, however, a team at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Washington state has developed a much lighter acoustic tag, that can be injected into fish using a needle. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Heddoko sportswear uses motion capture sensors to fine-tune your movements

Advances in 3D motion capture technology have added an extra layer of realism to sports video games like FIFA and Madden. But software engineer-turned entrepreneur Mazen Elbawab reckons you shouldn't need to enter a virtual world to move like your favorite athletes. His Heddoko line of sportswear comes equipped with sensors that capture the body's motion, to offer feedback on how you can perform more like the pros. Read More
— Science

DNAtrax tracks tainted food with molecular bar code

According to the US Center for Disease Control (CDC), 129,000 Americans are sent to hospital and 3,000 die each year from food poisoning. Currently, tracing contaminated food is largely a matter of record keeping and detective work, but Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, in partnership with DNATrek, have developed DNATrax, a DNA-based additive for directly tracking food from producer to consumer. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Glagla Connect shoes puts fitness tracking underfoot

If you're a fitness fanatic looking to use technology to monitor your activity, then slapping on a wristband like a Fitbit or a Jawbone might seem the easiest option. But in the eyes of French shoe company Glagla, there are things our footwork can tell us about our fitness that other body movements cannot. At this week's CES, it has wheeled out a pair of connected sports shoes that it claims can track fitness metrics with unrivaled accuracy. Read More
— Children Review

Review: LeapBand activity tracker for kids

Getting kids who are immersed in mobile devices to get up and start moving can be a bit of challenge, which is where an activity tracker for kids just might help. Leapfrog's LeapBand is a virtual pet gaming device merged with a fitness tracker that motivates kids to move using activity challenges and rewards. The more active they are, the more rewards they get to unlock cool new features. Is it enough to get them to be more physically active though? Read on to find out. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Jins Meme smart glasses have one eye on fatigue levels

Much of the hype surrounding smart glasses stems from their ability to inform us of our environment, adding virtual tidbits to what we see around us. But for Japanese eyewear manufacturer Jins, what these wearable computers can tell us about ourselves might prove just as valuable. The company has announced a new line of smart glasses that tracks eye movement to identify when fatigue levels are on the rise, offering up useful data to better manage our workloads. Read More