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Touch-technology

Mobile Technology

Batman-inspired software can give any phone pressure-sensing abilities

One of the features announced when the the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus were released that got the tech world buzzing was 3D Touch, the ability for the phone's screen to recognize how much force you're applying to it and respond accordingly with different navigation options. Now, inspired by a scene from a 2008 Batman movie, engineers from the University of Michigan (UM) have developed software that could bring touch sensitivity to all phones – and not just through their screens.Read More

Computers Review

Review: Taking a dip in Touchjet's Pond

About this time last year, a pint-sized mashup of projector and Android computer hit crowdfunding portal Indiegogo. The TouchPico allowed users to activate icons thrown on the wall or whiteboard using a stylus-like pointing device, effectively turning any flat surface into a giant touchscreen display. We got a chance to see the pre-release prototype in action at IFA 2014, engaging the company's Slava Solonitsyn in a quick fruity game on a nearby wall. The newly-named Touchjet Pond started shipping last month, and one of the first units off the production line made its way to Gizmag for review.Read More

Music

Jane offers pickup switching by touch

Even at first glance, there's something a little different about the Jane guitar from Switzerland's Pirmin Giger and Silvan Küng. It's not quite a single cut, nor is it a double cut. Its body is made up of three layers – an aluminum frame and two veneer wood panels. The back plate is not screwed in place, but is held in place by magnets and can be opened up using just a guitar pick. And its handmade humbucker pickups are selected using touch sensors rather than a 3- or 5-way pickup switch. It certainly looks like an appetizing combination that lives up to the brand name: Relish Guitars.Read More

Computers

TouchPico Android PC projects a touchscreen on the wall

Gizmag is no stranger to pocket-sized image projectors. We've shared the first baby steps from the likes of Microvision and TI, right through to integration in smartphones and even more recently in portable computers. Now the palm-friendly home-theater-sized display thrower has taken another leap forward with the launch of TouchPico, a portable projector-packing Android computer that can transform any flat surface into a big touchscreen display.Read More

Music

Touchmark touch control kills off guitar knobs

Los Angeles industrial designer and keen guitarist Mark Andersen says that close examination of playing patterns has revealed that the current knob/switch setup on most electric guitars results in "conflicting motion paths" when the player needs to tweak the tone or volume, or select a different pickup. His answer is to replace the pots and switches with a pair of touch panels on the pick guard, to convert your Strat-shaped axe into a Touchmark Guitar.Read More

Automotive

Smack Attack puts a drum kit on the steering wheel to make gridlock more fun

If you get regularly get caught in standstill traffic during your daily commute, Smack Attack could be for you. Pounding your fists on the steering wheel cover's eight touch sensors produces drum sounds over the top of whatever music you're listening to from your iPhone's music library. While it may look like something of a dangerous distraction, its inventor claims that it could actually help prevent accidents by keeping drivers stimulated and alert.Read More

Music

Seaboard GRAND alters notes on the fly with flexible keys

It's said that an instrument is only as good as the musician playing it, but it never hurts to give musicians a little help creating unique sounds. That's why technology start-up ROLI recently unveiled a new type of instrument that blends the form of a standard piano with the electronic customization of a digital controller. The company's Seaboard GRAND is a keyboard that features flexible keys that allow the player to adjust each note in real-time.Read More

Science

First pressure-sensitive, self-healing material developed

Our largest bodily organ is also one of the most remarkable. Not only is our skin pressure sensitive, it is also able to efficiently heal itself to provide a protective barrier between our insides and the world around us. While we’ve covered synthetic materials that can repair themselves or are pressure senstive, combining these properties in a single synthetic material has understandably proven more difficult. Now researchers at Stanford University have developed the first pressure-sensitive synthetic material that can heal itself when torn or cut, giving it potential for use in next-generation prostheses or self-healing electronic devices.Read More

Digital Cameras

Touchy wearer walks around in darkness until touched by a human hand

If you see what appears at first glance to be a short version of Robocop stumbling through the streets of Tokyo, worry not folks it will likely be Eric Siu or one of his friends using Touchy. The wearer of the head-mounted camera is effectively in darkness until someone touches him, at which point the automated shutters blinding the wearer open briefly and he can once again view the world around him. If the person maintains touch for ten seconds or more, the built-in camera snaps an image and then displays it on a small screen to the rear of the helmet.Read More

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