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Tools


— Around The Home

Black & Decker puts new "motion-activated" twist on the cordless screwdriver

By - August 20, 2012 9 Pictures
Motion sensing technology is just about everywhere these days. It allows smartphone or tablet gamers to control onscreen action (or even pilot an RC airplane) by tilting or twisting the device, can help feed the digital music muse and gives personal transport innovations like the Lit C-1 the ability to stand upright all by themselves. Now it's the turn of the powered screwdriver to break into this exciting and magical realm with the launch of the Gyro 4V MAX Lithium-ion Rechargeable Screwdriver from Black & Decker. Read More
— Good Thinking

TechShop provides inventors with the tools of the trade

By - July 19, 2012 3 Pictures
We got to do some fun things at last month’s Go Further With Ford conference, such as test-driving the new Mustang and the purpose-built Police Interceptor. On the final night of the event, however, us conference-goers really got to enjoy ourselves – we got to make stuff, at the Detroit branch of TechShop. In business since 2006, the company now has five shops located across the U.S., all of which provide inventors and other people with access to advanced tools and know-how. We spoke to CEO Mark Hatch to learn more about what the group has to offer, and to whom. Read More
— Good Thinking

iTapemeasure - a go-everywhere digital tape measure iPhone case

By - May 1, 2012 4 Pictures
You don't have to be a carpenter to find yourself regularly grabbing for a tape measure. Unfortunately, if you're not a carpenter, you probably find yourself grasping at loose air and denim as you remember that you don't wear a tool belt. The iTapemeasure is a combination app and case that attaches a digital tape measure to your iPhone, so you always have one at hand. Read More
— Around The Home

RoboReel pulls in its power cord at the touch of a button

By - April 17, 2012 3 Pictures
The winding up of extension cords is something that most of us probably don’t give a lot of thought to – we loop them on the ground, spool them around our forearm, or perhaps use a spring-activated or hand-cranked winder. If you’re someone who spends a lot of time putting cords away, however, you might want to make the job safer and easier. That’s where Great Stuff’s RoboReel comes in. It’s a portable motorized cord winder, with some interesting features. Read More
— Good Thinking

Wrenches with embedded LEDs make light of dimly lit fixit jobs

By - September 26, 2011
Homer Simpson's advice when his brother Herb shows him the baby translator he has invented is that Herb "should have just taken an existing product and put a clock in it or something." These days the "or something" could easily be a light or, more specifically, an LED as their tiny size, low cost and low power needs has seen them wedged inside a plethora of devices ... and not because it necessarily provides any real benefit. However, in the world of LED-embedded devices, this wrench set is far from the worst idea we've seen and could actually come in very handy. Read More
— Around The Home

Recoil Saw bounces its way through wood

By - December 15, 2010 5 Pictures
Using a hand saw is nobody’s idea of a good time, but one inventor is trying to at least make it a little easier. John Zimmerman, a software developer by trade, has created what he calls the Recoil Saw. Essentially, it’s just a saw – various types of saws, actually – with one or more spring-loaded impact bars attached to the blade. At the end of each stroke, the spring compresses as the bar hits the material being sawed, then releases that energy back into the following return stroke. The idea is that users can pretty much just bounce their way through cutting jobs, as opposed to having to purposefully stop and start between every stroke. Zimmerman, who admits he’s probably not the most unbiased tester, said that he has found it cuts twice as fast as a regular saw. Read More
— Science

Sonic screwdriver may become fact rather than fiction

By - December 7, 2010
The sonic screwdriver has proven an indispensable piece of equipment for Doctor Who when battling Daleks, Cybermen and the Master. The fictional tool is capable of opening just about any lock known to man - or alien - and can fix a damaged TARDIS in a matter of seconds. Now engineers at Bristol University say a real-life version of the sci-fi screwdriver could be created that would use sonic technology to open locks and undo screws ... just don't expect to see one under the Christmas tree this year. Read More
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