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Time

— Science

Quantum "spooky action at a distance" travels at least 10,000 times faster than light

By - March 10, 2013 4 Pictures
Quantum entanglement, one of the odder aspects of quantum theory, links the properties of particles even when they are separated by large distances. When a property of one of a pair of entangled particles is measured, the other "immediately" settles down into a state compatible with that measurement. So how fast is "immediately"? According to research by Prof. Juan Yin and colleagues at the University of Science and Technology of China in Shanghai, the lower limit to the speed associated with entanglement dynamics – or "spooky action at a distance" – is at least 10,000 times faster than light. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

The Tokyo Flash Kisai X is inspired by cryptography – and it shows

By - March 5, 2013 18 Pictures
For those who like their watches to be anything but traditional analog timepieces, ultra-modern watchmaker Tokyo Flash has unveiled its latest design in the Kisai range. The “Kisai X” is said to be inspired by cryptography – and it shows – with a difficult-to-decipher LED face displaying what at first glance appears to be sharp lines shining through a dark pyramid lens. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Sun and Moon Watch tells time with movement of celestial bodies

By - November 17, 2012 4 Pictures
In the 17th century, a period of experimentation began into how best to represent time. It was during this period of innovation that "Sun and Moon" watches – which literally showed the passing of time with moving images of these celestial bodies – became popular. The Sun and Moon Watch from Mr Jones Watches is a revival of this design, eschewing the familiar segmented face with hands and numerals showing the exact hour and minute in favor of visual representations of day and night. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Experiment ZR012 is the Wankel engine of watches

By - October 16, 2012 6 Pictures
A simple set of rotating hands or LCD digits may be the most recognizable, but horologists always like to find new ways of displaying the hours, minutes and seconds of the day. Inspired by the Wankel engine, the Experiment ZR012 watch uses a pair of rotating Reuleaux triangles to indicate the time. The larger rotor points to the hour on the outer border, while the smaller rotor points to the minute. Read More
— Electronics

Seiko Astron watch uses GPS to set the time anywhere in the world

By - September 17, 2012 6 Pictures
For the truly obsessive-compulsive who panic if their watch is even slightly off, the Seiko Astron GPS watch could be the answer. The world’s first solar-powered watch that can set the time with GPS signals, the Astron is accurate to within one second per 100,000 years and automatically adjusts to any timezone in the world. Seiko announced the release of the Astron back in March and it’s now going on sale worldwide. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Time goes hands-free with QLOCKTWO W watch

By - April 12, 2012 2 Pictures
Japan’s Tokyoflash has made a name for itself with numerous weird and wonderful – or maybe baffling - ways to tell the time. Now, bringing to mind Homer Simpson’s quote of, “From now on Honey, we'll be spelling everything with letters,” when Marge is impressed by a house that has its street number spelled out with letters, German design agency Biegert & Funk is set to release a wristwatch that fancies things up by telling the time in words. Read More

Super accurate nuclear clock proposed

The NIST-F1 atomic clock that currently serves as primary time and frequency standard for the U.S. is expected to neither gain nor lose a second in more than 100 million years. That might sound pretty accurate, but a proposed nuclear clock could make it look like a cheap digital wristwatch. It is claimed that the proposed clock would neither gain nor lose 1/20th of a second in 14 billion years. To put that in context, that’s the estimated age of the universe. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Sensor sleeves could maximize workplace efficiency

By - January 5, 2012 1 Picture
In factories where products are mass-produced, it's extremely important to know how long the human workers take to perform certain tasks. This not only allows the pace of the assembly line to be set, but it also allows factory owners to identify time-wasting problems such as superfluous movements, overly frequent tool changes, or impractically-located components. Typically, workers are periodically timed by a stopwatch-wielding supervisor, or using a timer that they start and stop themselves. A new wearable time-keeping system, however, promises more accurate readings. Read More
— Science

Timekeeping on a grand scale – the 10,000 Year Clock

By - June 22, 2011 4 Pictures
When we hear about things being built to last, we usually think in terms of years or decades ... or maybe, centuries. But millennia? Well yes, if you’re talking about the 10,000 Year Clock. As its name implies, the 200 foot (61 meter)-tall timepiece is intended to run for 10,000 years, in a remote cave in West Texas. The clock’s “century hand” will advance one space every 100 years, although individuals who make the trek to the cave will be able to hear it chime once a day. The whole project is designed to get people thinking in the long term. Read More
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