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Thermal Imaging

— Science

Tech can tell if you're in love

As Valentine's Day fast approaches, many people in the thralls of a new relationship may find themselves wondering, "Does he/she really love me?". Well, if those people have access to a thermal imaging camera, they may just get their answer – at least, so a group of researchers at the University of Granada tells us.

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— Military

BAE Systems combines night vision goggles with thermal targeting

In military parlance, the job of a soldier is to find, fix, and finish the enemy. However, this is a bit difficult when the soldier has to fumble with different scopes while keeping eyes on the target. To simplify things, BAE Systems is developing a combination night vision and thermal imaging system that not only allows soldiers to rapidly acquire and engage targets in all weather and lighting, but also to remotely aim their weapons without looking through the sights.

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— Mobile Technology

Seek Thermal launches thermal camera attachment for mobile phones

Ever wonder if there’s something hiding in the bushes at night or if your door seals are leaking heat in the winter? A thermal imaging camera is one way of answering these questions, but they tend to be bulky and very pricey. California-based Seek Thermal is aiming to bring thermal imaging into the consumer realm with its small, relatively affordable thermal camera smartphone accessory. Read More
— Electronics

Omnidirectional thermal visualizer enables 360-degree surveillance

Researchers at the Multimedia University (MMU) in Malaysia have developed an omnidirectional thermal visualizer that provides a 360-degree view of the area under surveillance. The device, the researchers say, can monitor more than one lane at a time in airports and crowded areas, making it easier for authorities to quickly identify people with flu or SARS-like symptoms. Read More
— Digital Cameras

FLIR turns the heat up on smartphone thermal imaging

FLIR Systems, Inc. announced two new products at CES designed to put thermal imaging into the hands of consumers. The first is a new, consumer-level infrared thermal camera sensor, while the second is a slide-on attachment for Apple iPhone 5 or 5s smartphones that makes use of said sensor. Both could be used to locate lost pets in the dark, look for energy leaking from your house, or to watch for wildlife. Read More
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