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Textile

A bracelet made using i.materialise's flexible Rubber-like material

Most 3D-printed objects are made out of rigid plastic or resin materials that aren't necessarily ideal for every project. Now, for a limited time online shops like i.materialise are offering designers the chance to play with experimental materials that have properties akin to rubber. Currently these materials are only being offered on a limited basis, but they're already paving the way for new ideas, including one haute couture dress that paraded down the catwalk at Spring Fashion Week 2013 earlier this year.  Read More

The new fabric sucks sweat from one side to the other where it drains away, as demonstrate...

Unsightly underarm sweat patches could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a new fabric developed at the University of California, Davis. Instead of simply soaking up sweat like conventional fabrics, the new fabric is threaded with tiny channels that pull the sweat from one side to the other where it forms into droplets that drain away.  Read More

A custom-fit Varstiff wrist brace could be applied and removed in seconds, yet remain rigi...

Items such as the traditional cervical collar, used by emergency medical technicians to immobilize the heads and necks of accident victims, may soon be getting some competition. Developed by Spanish research center Tecnalia, Varstiff is a textile material that is ordinarily soft and malleable, but that achieves a hardness equivalent to that of rigid plastic once a vacuum is applied.  Read More

A cross-sectional image of the new silicon-based optical fiber with solar-cell capabilitie...

Imagine forgetting to plug in your smartphone, but then not worrying because your clothes could charge it for you. It sounds surreal, but it may one day be reality. An international team of scientists and engineers led by John Badding, a professor of chemistry at Penn State University, have developed a silicon-based optical fiber that acts like a solar cell and offers the promise of fabric that can generate electricity from light.  Read More

Who wouldn't want to wear clothing inspired by these guys?

Hagfish are super-slimy eel-like fish that live on the sea floor, where they feed on the carcasses of other sea creatures. Before you start disliking them too much, however, take note – synthetic fabrics of the future may be inspired by their slime.  Read More

Might better linen be the answer to the problem of bedsores? (Photo: John Tyler)

A team of Swiss researchers has developed a new kind of bed linen with the intention of reducing the occurrence of bedsores among bedridden patients. The new "dot matrix" linen is designed to reduce the contact surface against the skin while allowing for greater absorption of problem moisture that can otherwise exacerbate the problem.  Read More

'Real' leather, like that pictured above, could soon face competition from a lab-grown sub...

According to many people, meat and leather are an ethical and environmental nightmare, causing misery to billions of animals and wreaking havoc on the planet’s ecosystems. While mankind may not turn entirely vegan in the next generation, a more humane and cleaner type of leather could become available in the near future (and meat a few years later) thanks to the development of an in-vitro version of the material being developed by Modern Meadow.  Read More

Vapor Apparel will be launching its new ECO Spin recycled fabric range at the EcoPrint sho...

The textile and fashion industries have a huge environmental footprint as their production cycles rely on oil, pesticides, and great amounts of energy and water. For that reason, some companies are looking for new manufacturing methods, including recycling, as a way to mitigate their ecological footprint. One of them is Vapor Apparel, a U.S. company specializing in performance fabrics and digital sublimation printing that is launching a new range of 100 percent recycled fabric during the upcoming EcoPrint show in Berlin, Germany.  Read More

adidas produced 50,000 t-shirts using the resourse-saving DryDye process in Q2 2012

Textiles are a resource-heavy business. In an effort to reduce water consumption, energy use and a need for chemicals, adidas created the DryDye technology, which uses pressurized CO2 in place of water to dye t-shirts and other garments.  Read More

The researchers used a standard T-shirt purchased from a local discount store for their wo...

As manufacturers of smartphones and mobile devices strive to make their products increasingly portable, they repeatedly come up against the constraints of existing battery technology. However, Xiaodong Li, a professor at the University of South Carolina (USC) believes that we will soon be able to employ the clothes we wear to help overcome such challenges and to this end, Li has transformed T-shirt material into an energy storage medium which could one day be used to power portable devices.  Read More

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