Advertisement
more top stories »

Textile


— Science

Biodegradable fibers as strong as steel made from wood cellulose

By - June 9, 2014 2 Pictures
A team of researchers working at Stockholm's KTH Royal Institute of Technology claim to have developed a way to make cellulose fibers stronger than steel on a strength-to-weight basis. In what is touted as a world first, the team from the institute's Wallenberg Wood Science Center claim that the new fiber could be used as a biodegradable replacement for many filament materials made today from imperishable substances such as fiberglass, plastic, and metal. And all this from a substance that requires only water, wood cellulose, and common table salt to create it. Read More
— Electronics

Graphene and carbon nanotubes combined to create flexible, wearable supercapacitor

By - May 15, 2014 3 Pictures
An international team of researchers has developed a supercapacitor composed of graphene and carbon nanotubes that is claimed flexible enough to be woven into clothing and potentially powerful enough to offer a real alternative to batteries for use in portable devices. Capable of being charged and discharged in excess of 10,000 cycles, the new supercapacitor also promises to be significantly lighter, faster to charge, and more robust than current battery technology. Read More
— Sports

Adidas' metallic Climachill apparel cools athletes in hot conditions

By - April 15, 2014 11 Pictures
The sports apparel market has no shortage of solutions for cold weather, with waterproof-breathable materials, advanced natural and synthetic insulations, and battery powered heat among them. But athletes have fewer options in hot, humid weather: take off clothing, get a cold headband/cloth, or stop exercising and find an air conditioner or pool. Adidas offers one more. Its new Climachill fabric combines several cooling elements to keep athletes more comfortable during hot summer sessions. Read More
— Good Thinking

goBin smart textile-recycling bin makes donating a snap

By - January 21, 2014 2 Pictures
Goodwill of San Francisco has launched a smart donation bin called goBin that aims to make donating old clothes and other textiles a snap. Instead of having to make a regular trip to a Goodwill store, the bin will allow residents of apartment towers to donate their stuff from the comfort of their buildings. Developed in collaboration with the global product strategy firm, Frog Design, the high-tech textile-recycling bin is expected to help the city's environmental department reach its goal of making San Francisco a zero waste city by 2020. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Coffee socks keep your feet cool and smell-free

By - July 4, 2013 4 Pictures
Traditional dress socks are not very gentle to the feet, what with all the heat and sweat they can generate. But new technology can provide new levels of comfort that were not possible until now. From the makers of the high-tech Apollo Shirt, Ministry of Supply once again evokes Greek mythology to launch another sartorial innovation in the shape Atlas, high tech socks that come with a promise of cool and comfortable feet. Read More
— 3D Printing

New flexible materials pave the way for 3D-printed clothing

By - June 3, 2013 13 Pictures
Most 3D-printed objects are made out of rigid plastic or resin materials that aren't necessarily ideal for every project. Now, for a limited time online shops like i.materialise are offering designers the chance to play with experimental materials that have properties akin to rubber. Currently these materials are only being offered on a limited basis, but they're already paving the way for new ideas, including one haute couture dress that paraded down the catwalk at Spring Fashion Week 2013 earlier this year. Read More

Varstiff acts like an instant, reversible cast

Items such as the traditional cervical collar, used by emergency medical technicians to immobilize the heads and necks of accident victims, may soon be getting some competition. Developed by Spanish research center Tecnalia, Varstiff is a textile material that is ordinarily soft and malleable, but that achieves a hardness equivalent to that of rigid plastic once a vacuum is applied. Read More
— Science

New type of optical fiber could be used in photovoltaic fabrics

By - December 10, 2012 2 Pictures
Imagine forgetting to plug in your smartphone, but then not worrying because your clothes could charge it for you. It sounds surreal, but it may one day be reality. An international team of scientists and engineers led by John Badding, a professor of chemistry at Penn State University, have developed a silicon-based optical fiber that acts like a solar cell and offers the promise of fabric that can generate electricity from light. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement