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Suspension

The Vyrus 986 M2 Factory

Boutique Italian motorcycle company Vyrus is hoping to cause a real shake-up in top-level racing by entering its radically unorthodox Vyrus 986 M2 Factory in the heavily standardised Moto2 competition. With the same weight, engine, tyres and electronics as its opponents, the Vyrus bike is more or less a controlled experiment in the racetrack effectiveness of hub-center steering. It will be the first time in decades that we've seen a machine enter top-level racing without a set of traditional telescopic forks at the front end. If it succeeds, it has a real chance at causing a suspension revolution in the sportsbike world. Oh, and there's streetbike and kit versions available too. Very exciting news.  Read More

Lamborghini introduces pushrod suspension to series production

One of the highlights of the upcoming Geneva Motor Show will be the unveiling of Lamborghini’s Murciélago successor – a V12 range-topper bristling with the technological candy demanded by the marque’s aficionados. Earlier today, Lamborghini released further details of the new vehicle and true to form, some of the componentry is very special: the electrically powered parking brake; the 400mm carbon ceramic discs with six cylinder calipers ; and the separation of wheel control and damper via an aluminum double wishbone pushrod suspension. The F1-inspired suspension offers race-car precision yet long distance comfort and further strengthens the bleeding-edge brand values of the Volkswagen-owned super sports manufacturer.  Read More

Use the force Lu.. ah, Magnetic Suspension Device

Ever wanted to levitate a can or bottle inside an illuminated ring? Of course you have. Well, this device from Chinavasion uses the force to do just that. Unfortunately it uses force of the magnetic variety and not the Jedi kind, but the snappily named Magnetic Suspension Device is sure to be a conversation starter nonetheless.  Read More

Diagram of the regenerative shock absorber and the cross section of the magnet assembly

Only 10-16 percent of the fuel energy is used to drive the car during everyday usage – that is, to overcome the resistance from road friction and air drag and actually transport the vehicle forward. That amounts to a lot of energy being wasted. Hybrid cars recapture some of the energy usually lost in braking but the dissipation of vibration energy by shock absorbers in the vehicle suspension remains an untapped source of potential energy. To harvest this lost energy, researchers have designed and tested a shock absorber that can be retrofitted to cars to convert the kinetic energy of suspension vibration between the wheel and sprung mass into useful electrical power.  Read More

The Pronghorn mountain bike frame with APLS - the suspension unit is mounted on the top tu...

Serious mountain bikers are always looking for a competitive edge. Often, that can mean extracting every ounce of energy from their bodies and their equipment. Danish high-end mountain bike builder Pronghorn has designed a bike frame the company calls its Anti-Power-Loss-System (APLS) where the rear shock absorber is mounted on the top tube. This, says the company, better utilizes the rider’s energy by delivering power more efficiently to the back wheel when the rider needs it - climbing uphill or negotiating technical courses - while performing like a full suspension model on the downslope.  Read More

Cannondale's prototype Simon computer-controlled suspension fork

After five years of development, Cannondale has unveiled a new proof-of-concept prototype that could revolutionize bicycle suspension. Called Simon, it’s the newest member of their offbeat Lefty line of one-legged shock forks. According to Cannondale, Simon’s onboard microprocessor will allow users to customize their ride like never before. If that isn’t enough, it can also send the fork from being fully-open to fully-closed in just six milliseconds.  Read More

Ford vehicle dynamics manager Norbert Kessing led development of new Mondeo's active suspe...

August 29, 2007 Ford is set to make a major production milestone with the launch of an active suspension system on the new Ford Mondeo. Available as a UKP650 option in the UK, that not only provides a comfortable ride but combines this with sportiness and safety. Ironically, sound pioneer Amar Bose was the first to devise a suspension system designed to do exactly what it should do rather than approximating it with springs and dampers, but Ford looks set to be the first to offer it on a regular production car. Called Interactive Vehicle Dynamic Control (IVDC), the system offers near constant suspension adjustment to match desired ride with road conditions and driving style  Read More

Audi's new magnetic semi-active suspension system

June 18, 2006 The Audi TT is a cult car, an icon –from the day it made its debut, in autumn 1998, it took the sports coupe segment by storm, sharpening the brand's profile in the process. We reported on the coming of the second generation of this successful model in April but overlooked one of the most interesting facets of the new machine which uses a completely new form of damping technology developed in conjunction with Delphi that resolves the age-old conflict between comfort and driving dynamics without countenancing any of the otherwise unavoidable compromises. As a continuously adaptive system, it adapts the damping characteristic to the profile of the road and the driver's gear-shifting habits within just a few milliseconds. The shock absorber pistons on the TT do not contain conventional oil, but a magneto-rheological fluid – a synthetic hydrocarbon oil in which microscopically small magnetic particles measuring between three and ten microns are enclosed. When a voltage is applied to a coil – by means of a pulse delivered by a control unit – a magnetic field is created in which the alignment of the particles changes. They position themselves transversely to the direction of flow of the oil, and so inhibit its flow through the piston channels. This alters the characteristic of the damping characteristic much faster than is the case in conventional adaptive dampers.  Read More

Polaris brings independent rear suspension to the Quad market

April 1, 2006 The Polaris Outlaw hit the showroom floor recently with an innovation unmatched by any current Quad bike. The Outlaw is the only sport ATV on the market with independent rear suspension and the importance of keeping driving wheels in contact with the ground makes this a significant competitive advantage. The Outlaw’s PRO IRS gives greater control and higher speed capability over rough terrain by smoothing out ruts and bumps and the anti-sway bar provides the handling of a straight axle in the corners. With 29.2cm of ground clearance, the Outlaw offers more than anything else in the segment with more than twice the clearance of some straight axle quads.  Read More

The world’s first full size dual suspension folding bike

February 27, 2006 Innovative bicycle company Onyerbike has released a four bike range of foldable, full-size, dual-suspension bikes that finally offer high spec bikes you can tuck comfortably out of the way for ease of transportation or if you live in limited space or dorm/barracks accommodation. The top-of-the-range Hawk comes with adjustable suspension at both ends (lock out front suspension and air shock rear), magnesium wheels, a lightweight aircraft grade 7005 aluminium frame and Tektro disc brakes. The onyerbike range is unique in that it is the first to offer 26 inch wheels instead of the 20, 16 or 14 inch wheels which generally are used in folding bike solutions, so offering a genuine go-anywhere (on- or off-road) at-a-reasonable-clip bike. The company is seeking international dealers and distributors.  Read More

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