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Surveillance

— Computers

LiveLight algorithm lets you skip the boring parts of a video

By - June 26, 2014 3 Pictures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed "LiveLight," a machine learning algorithm that can automatically scan through a video, understand what's happening and cut out the repetitive and boring parts. And it can do this without human supervision, saving you plenty of uneventful viewing time. This technology could be especially useful for reviewing security camera feeds or as a help in creating compelling video highlights. Read More
— Urban Transport

Segway launches three-wheeled SE-3 Patroller

By - May 21, 2014 8 Pictures
Segway has announced that its family of patrol vehicles is about to get a new member. Developed for the security, law enforcement, emergency response and military markets, the new SE-3 Patroller is a little different from its self-balancing two-wheeled stablemates. It has been treated to a third wheel out front, reportedly giving the stand-up electric vehicle a greater visible presence, even when parked, and allowing for easier mount and dismount. Read More
— Military

Exelis tests versatile new airborne sensor for explosives and dangerous chemicals

By - May 18, 2014 2 Pictures
Hyperspectral imaging is a bit like super-vision. With it, you can not only see what’s there, but what it’s made of, which is a good thing if you’re looking for bombs, gas leaks, and smuggled nuclear material. Defense and information systems specialist Exelis has announced the successful test of a new airborne long-wave infrared (LWIR), hyperspectral (HSI) sensor that can be aimed in multiple directions and is capable of detecting explosives, gases and dangerous chemicals. Read More
— Electronics

Omnidirectional thermal visualizer enables 360-degree surveillance

By - May 16, 2014 2 Pictures
Researchers at the Multimedia University (MMU) in Malaysia have developed an omnidirectional thermal visualizer that provides a 360-degree view of the area under surveillance. The device, the researchers say, can monitor more than one lane at a time in airports and crowded areas, making it easier for authorities to quickly identify people with flu or SARS-like symptoms. Read More
— Science

Facial recognition is in (the reflection of) the eye of the beholder

By - January 16, 2014 6 Pictures
The worst has happened. You receive an emailed kidnap demand with a picture of your loved one in dire straits. You contact the authorities, and in a flash (relatively speaking), they have identified the kidnapper and possibly some accomplices, and are well on their way toward recovering the victim. How did this happen? By identifying the faces of the kidnappers caught in the reflection of your loved one's eyes. Read More
— Aircraft

2013: The year of the drone

By - December 29, 2013 6 Pictures
Although aerial drones been around in one form or another since World War I, it hasn’t really been until the last decade that they’ve really taken off, so to speak. Where they were once restricted to a spot of battlefield reconnaissance, in addition to military applications, drones are now used for everything from agriculture to oil prospecting and by everyone from rescue workers to real estate agents. Although the technological advances and proliferation of drones has accelerated over the past decade, 2013 was the year that the technology really entered the public consciousness. So let’s have a look back at Gizmag’s pick of the top drone stories of 2013. Read More
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