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Sunscreen

Treated paper warns users of impending sunburn

As any dermatologist will tell you, it's important to know when to get out of the sunlight – or at least, when to apply more sunscreen. As a result, there are now various UV exposure-monitoring devices that tell us when to seek the shade. Not everyone wants to buy one, however, plus some of the single-use models contain environmentally-harmful materials. With that in mind, scientists have developed cheap, disposable eco-friendly sensors that are made of paper.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

UBSafe tells you when to seek the shade

A new UV-monitoring device may help take some of the guesswork out of knowing how much time to spend in the sun. Developed by Australia's Healthtronics Sunsafe, the UBSafe come in three different models, and is attached to a hat or other headwear. From that location, it can tell you when your particular skin type has had just the right amount of UVB rays.Read More

Biology

Fish that produce their own sunscreen could inspire improved UV protection

If you happen to be frolicking around in some tropical waters at some point in the future, you may have the marine life circling your feet to thank for keeping your shoulders from roasting. Scientists have uncovered a technique used by zebrafish and various other animals to create their own sunscreen and recreated it in the lab. They say the method could one day be used to produce sunscreen and other pharmaceuticals for humans.Read More

Good Thinking

2014 James Dyson Award international winners announced

James Roberts, a 23 year-old design grad from Britain's Loughborough University, has won this year's international James Dyson Award for his portable inflatable incubator. Called MOM, the device is intended to be a low-cost alternative to traditional incubators, allowing premature babies in places such as refugee camps to survive when they might otherwise perish. Read on for more details on it, along with the three runners-up. Read More

Science

Unlocking the sunscreen code of marine life may offer complete UV protection

The next generation of powerful sunscreens may have their roots in some unlikely sources – corals from the Great Barrier Reef and bacteria found in the Trondheim Fjord in Norway. When developed, these new sunscreens could offer protection across a wider band of ultraviolet (UV) radiation suspected to cause deadly forms of skin cancer, which current sunscreens don't protect against. The discoveries represent huge breakthroughs, made possible by harnessing the natural sunscreen abilities that these life forms have developed over millions of years to survive the harsh UV radiation in their respective environments. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

UV-measuring wrist band lets you know when to reapply sunscreen

If you spend much time outdoors in the summer, then you doubtless know how important it is to wear sunscreen. That said, you probably also know that just applying it once before you first go outside isn’t good enough – for sufficient protection from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, periodic reapplications are also necessary. The UVeBand is a new wearable device, that’s designed to let you know when it’s time for those reapplications.Read More

Science

Coral may be a vital ingredient in sunscreen pill

Researchers from King's College London have recently discovered a natural compound produced by coral that could be suitable for use in a new type of sunscreen for humans, and it may even come in a pill! As coral is generally found in shallow waters, it therefore naturally produces a type of "sunscreen" to protect itself from the sun's UV rays. It is this natural sunscreen that scientists hope to synthetically re-create for human use.Read More

Science

Ivy nanoparticles a safer and more effective option for sunblock

Just as an examination of the burrs of seeds that kept sticking to his clothes led Swiss engineer, George de Mestral, to develop Velcro, a search for an explanation as to why the ivy in his backyard clung to this fence so tightly has led Mingjun Zhnag to a new discovery. It seems that tiny particles secreted from ivy rootlets could have applications for military technologies, medical adhesives, drug delivery and, most recently, sun-block that could protect skin from UV radiation at least four times better than the metal-based sunblocks found on store shelves today. Read More

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