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Stylus

TapSense is an experimental touchscreen system, that is able to tell the difference betwee...

Small touchscreen devices such smartphones certainly have their attractions, but they also have one drawback – there isn’t much room on their little screens for touch-sensitive features. This means that users will sometimes instead have to go into sub-menus, or make do with jabbing their fingers at tiny controls. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute, however, are working on an alternative. Their prototype TapSense system can differentiate between screen taps from different parts of the finger, and will perform different tasks accordingly.  Read More

The Galaxy Note next to Tim's Galaxy S II

Samsung showed its new Note smartphone today at IFA, just 12 months after it showed the Galaxy Tab to great acclaim, and when history judges the 5.3” supersized smartphone it just might play a much greater role in the development of the personal computer form factor. The incorporation of a stylus and the 1280×800 high-resolution Super AMOLED screen give the thin android phone additional functionality by way of both sketching and note-taking and when Gizmag's Tim Hanlon tried the phone with its 1.4GHz dual-core processor, he's now thinking of trading in his Galaxy SII. “I'm sold” reported Tim from Berlin.  Read More

The APEN A3 lets users write on paper in ink, but digitizes that writing and sends it on t...

Computer styluses are certainly handy, but it can be kind of tricky when you're writing or drawing on a stylus pad, yet you can only see what you're doing up on the screen. The resulting scrawls often have ... shall we say, a child-like appeal. Writing on paper with ink is definitely easier, but how do you get what you've done into a computer? Scan it, page by page? Well, yes you could, but now - in the spirit of Livescribe's Pulse smartpen - you could also use E FUN's APEN A3.  Read More

The Quillit 3 in 1 Stylus Pen features retractable stylii for capacitive (left) and resist...

While fingers are by far and away the most popular form of input device for touchscreens these days, using a stylus offers an accuracy that stubby fingers like mine just can’t match. While just about any stick of plastic will do for resistive touchscreens, capacitive touchscreens that rely on a distortion of the screen’s electrostatic field require a stylus that is electrically conducting. If your day finds you switching between devices that use different touchscreen technologies then the new Quillit 3 in 1 Stylus Pen from Proporta will cover all the bases. It will even let you interact with that most ancient of displays – paper – as it its third function is as an ordinary pen.  Read More

The disc at the end of the oStylus allows users to see the point of contact on a capacitiv...

If you've ever tried to create a work of digital art on an iPad then you may have suffered the frustration of not being able to see exactly what's going on directly beneath your finger. Even a stylus can't offer an ideal view of the exact edge of those thin outlines. Looking somewhat like it should be in the hands of a dentist, the oStylus solves this by giving tablet artists a porthole to the screen beneath. There's no need for cables or driver software, the capacitive screen for which this device was designed simply registers the flat disc at the end as though it was a human digit.  Read More

Fujitsu's new resistive multi-touch panel detects finger and stylus input simultaneously

Fujitsu has announced the release of multi-input resistive touch panels with the ability to detect simultaneous inputs. This means that potentially you could have input coming from your finger and from a stylus at the very same time. While multi-touch is nothing new to most readers (especially those with a taste for Apple products), it should be clarified that this functionality is normally associated with capacitive touch screens and not resistive panels like these new ones from Fujitsu.  Read More

The enTourage eDGe eBook dualscreen reader

When is an eBook reader not merely an eBook reader? When it’s an enTourage eDGE reader. Unveiled this week at CES the clamshell designed reader is billed as the world’s first dualbook, with a 9.7” black and white E-ink screen on the one side and 10.1” LCD color touchscreen on the other. Along with 4GB of internal memory and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capability, the unit functions as a mini-netbook, notepad and audio/video recorder.  Read More

The Nintendo DSi LL features larger 4.2-inch dual screens, a bigger pen-like stylus and im...

A new model Nintendo DSi console is being launched this month in Japan with larger 4.2-inch dual screens and a larger stylus. The DSi LL will be bundled with three DSiWare titles pre-installed – a dictionary and two brain training games, and a large and smaller touch pen. It will, however, have the same resolution as the previous DSi. Nintendo says the battery can last around four-five hours in extensive use mode and approximately 13-17 hours in energy-saving mode. These are around 25 percent improvements over previous models.  Read More

LG's Android powered LG-GW620 smartphone

LG has announced the release of its first foray in to the Android powered world of smartphones, the LG-GW620, aimed at meeting the demands of both first time and existing smartphone users.  Read More

Scribble down important notes in an instant with the Scratch N Scroll

Older Gizmag readers may remember the Etch A Sketch, a child’s doodling utensil that used aluminium powder and a glass screen to draw horizontal and vertical lines and the Magna Doodle, a similar product that used a magnetic drawing board. A cheap and cheerful version of the latter, often called the ‘magic slate’, consisted of a pad and stylus that allowed scribbles to be erased by lifting off and replacing a film of plastic. This concept has now been rather cleverly turned into a Mouse Pad called the Scratch-n-Scroll.  Read More

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