Photokina 2014 highlights

Structural Mechanics

Purdue associate professor of computer graphics Bedrich Benes, with an assortment of objec...

One of the great things about 3D printers is the fact that they allow anyone to become a manufacturer of small items. Unfortunately, however, they don't allow anyone to become a competent structural engineer – just because you can whip up a three-dimensional design on your computer doesn’t mean that it will translate into a sturdy physical object. That’s why researchers from Purdue University and Adobe's Advanced Technology Labs teamed up to create a program that automatically alters such designs, adding strengthening features to them before they get printed.  Read More

A free-surface simulation of the forces experienced when diving helped in the design of Sp...

A controversy during the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics was Speedo's introduction of its drag reducing LZR Racer swimming outfit. The suit worked so well that it was subsequently outlawed by the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) as the technological equivalent of doping - it gave too large an advantage. Now, with the help of ANSYS simulation software, and just in time for the 2012 London Summer Olympics, Speedo has introduced the Fastskin3 racing system, which offers a new and apparently legal approach to drag reduction during competitive swimming.  Read More

Bridge between worlds of simulation codes

March 8, 2006 Simulation is vital to design and engineering: without repeated virtual testing, few high-end products would be what they are now. With an increasing need for high quality and reliable simulations multidisciplinary solutions become more and more important. Simulation technology is everywhere. Whether they are developing rocket engines, vehicle exhaust systems, bridges, heart valves or pressure valves, engineers always start by drawing up numerical equations. The equations for determining the various forces that combustion chambers, buildings or valves have to withstand and those that they need to control come from diverse physical disciplines. They may deal with the flow characteristics of gases or liquids on one hand, and mechanical forces on the other. Established numeric simulation codes exist for a majority of problems, but these can only partially represent reality: Coupling of different simulation codes, each specialized for a specific physical regime, is becoming more and more important for numerical simulations, both in industry and in research. The reason is that in many real-world applications the interaction of different physical phenomena must be taken into consideration in order to achieve high-quality predictions. The magic formula is known as 'code coupling'.  Read More

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