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Strokes

A new device known as NIRS uses light to non-invasively monitor blood oxygenation in the b...

Approximately one third of stroke patients experience another stroke while they’re still in the hospital. Nurses therefore keep a close eye on them, and arrange for them to be taken for tests if a subsequent stroke is suspected. Unfortunately these tests can be invasive, and in some cases are even potentially harmful to the patient. A new device being developed at the Mayo Clinic in Florida, however, could watch for strokes simply by shining light onto a patient’s forehead.  Read More

The ArmAssist system is designed to help stroke victims regain the use of their arms by pl...

This April, researchers from Montreal's McGill University announced the development of their prototype Biomedical Sensor Glove. Stroke victims who have lost the use of their hand are intended the wear the glove, then use it at home to play custom video games on an attached computer. Not only do those games help them regain the use of their hand, but the computer also sends data regarding their gaming performance on to their physician, so they can track the patient's progress remotely. Well, it seems that Spanish researchers have now developed a similar system for the rehabilitation of paralyzed arms, called ArmAssist.  Read More

A new device is able to non-invasively measure the temperature of patient's brains by meas...

Whether caused by strokes in seniors or hypoxia in newborn infants, brain injuries can cause the brain to overheat, which in turn causes its cells to die. While there are cooling therapies that can bring its temperature down, doctors first need to establish that the brain is indeed warmer than the rest of the patient’s body. While doing so has previously involved invasive techniques, researchers from Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters (CHKD) in Norfolk, Virginia have recently created a small device that sits on top of the patient’s head, and measures their brain’s temperature non-invasively.  Read More

A new technique for regenerating blood vessels has implications for victims of coronary ar...

Researchers at the University of Western Ontario have discovered a new strategy for helping the body make blood vessels in vulnerable or damaged tissue. The approach, which has implications for the treatment of victims of coronary artery disease, involves the use of a protein named fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) to assist the "supporting" cells of new blood vessels as they are formed by the body.  Read More

A new head-worn device uses sonar for quick detection, diagnosis and monitoring of stroke

A team of radiologists and retired US Navy sonar experts have used technology developed for submarines as the basis for a new device which offers quick detection, diagnosis and monitoring of stroke. Combined with a portable laptop based console, the head-worn device enables different types of stroke and brain injury to be discovered and located, differentiating normal blood flow from life threatening conditions and delivering an initial diagnosis in under a couple of minutes.  Read More

An experimental new stroke treatment replicates and enhances the brain's natural reaction ...

It’s certainly not a news flash to say that being in a stimulating environment, where there’s plenty to perceive and think about, is good for the brain – new neural pathways are formed, and existing ones are kept from atrophying. Now, however, researchers have discovered a way of replicating and reinforcing those good effects in any environment. It is hoped that the new technology will allow strokes to be treatable up to two days after they have occurred. Most current treatments must be administered within a matter of hours after the event.  Read More

The Amadeo Robotic Hand and Tibion Robotic Leg are helping to rehabilitate stroke victims

It's a long time since The Six Million Dollar Man graced our TV screens; indeed, many Gizmag readers may be too young to have heard of Steve Austin, the Bionic Man. Bionics and robotics have come a long way in the past few years, and while we're not yet creating bionic men and women, we can at least claim to make people "better, stronger, and faster." A robotic hand and bionic leg undergoing clinical trials at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center are two promising neurorehabilitation devices that are helping stroke survivors regain movement in affected limbs by rewiring neural pathways.  Read More

SHELTER device traps and removes blood clots in the brain  Credit: Zina Deretsky, NSF

By the time you finish reading this, two people in the U.S. will have suffered a stroke, or brain attack. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in the United States and claimed over 130,000 lives last year. Of those who survive, hundreds are left debilitated every day. Ischemic strokes, a blood clot or break in blood vessels in the brain, are responsible for 80% of all strokes. Fast treatment is critical; more than a million brain cells die each minute after onset of a symptoms, and the risk of brain damage increases rapidly if the clot is not removed within three hours. A new device, SHELTER, offers hope of extending the time a patient can get help. It filters and removes clots and can be custom-fit for the specific length and diameter of a patient's clot.  Read More

The Penumbra System of Continuous Aspiration Thrombectomy, sucking out a blood clot

Twenty-seven stroke victims are alive and well today because of a new tool that vacuums clots out of blood vessels in the brain. Known as the Penumbra System of Continuous Aspiration Thrombectomy, the technology has been assessed at the Seaman MR Research Centre at Canada’s University of Calgary. If used within a few hours of a stroke, it can restore blood flow to the brain, thus reversing the effects of the stroke and preventing any permanent brain damage.  Read More

Designer Creates Fashionable Dinner Bib for Mother, a Stroke Victim

August 18, 2005 "No! My Mother is not wearing a giant baby bib," Joy Murphy repeated over and over when she tried to buy her mother an adult dinner bib. Murphy's Mother had suffered a stroke that left her paralysed on her left side and Mom had trouble keeping food in her mouth. The only adult dinner bibs on the market were just giant baby bibs. So she created fashionable adult dinner bibs for seniors. "I refused to buy the giant sized baby bibs," says Murphy. "They are too big, too ugly and too heavy. My Mother is not wearing a giant baby bib because she deserves something better, she deserves something stylish, fashionable and more dignified." So Murphy, a seamstress, designer and online entrepreneur went to work in her attic workshop and created fashionable dinner bibs for men and women called Aunt Joy's Fancy Bibs.  Read More

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