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Steve Jobs

— Mobile Technology

Five years ago today, Apple reinvented the personal computer

By - January 26, 2015 5 Pictures
Five years ago today, Steve Jobs stood onstage and talked about a new kind of mobile device that would sit somewhere between smartphone and laptop. After a spot-on dismissal of netbooks ("they aren't better at anything"), he showed us Apple's answer: the iPad. Half a decade later, tablets may be well-trodden ground, but there's still no question that the iPad was a breakthrough innovation that changed our world. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Is iWatch gesture control how Steve Jobs "cracked the code" of iTV?

By - February 25, 2013 1 Picture
In Walter Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs, the late Apple CEO is quoted as saying that he finally “cracked the code” of an Apple TV set. “It will have the simplest user interface you could imagine,” Isaacson quoted Jobs. “I finally cracked it.” What if Jobs’ secret was Apple’s rumored smartwatch? And what if that secret involved hands-free 3D gesture control? Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

Steve Jobs' most disruptive trait: his obsession with the customer's experience

By - October 5, 2012 4 Pictures
On this anniversary of Steve Jobs' death, we aren't going to pretend like we personally knew and loved him. We didn't. But as customers who have bought products from every company under the sun, we can discern what may have been his most unique defining trait. Despite Jobs' long-term vision, his obsession with design, and his ability to make people believe what he was saying (even when he was full of it) – his most important quality may have been his devotion to the customer experience. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People Feature

The business legacy of Mr. Jobs

Revered by many, hated by some, but respected by most, the indisputable fact remains that Steve Jobs is the most successful business leader of his generation and quite possibly of all time. The numbers are impressive in themselves but the most remarkable aspect of his success is how it was achieved. Though he remains at Apple, the end of his tenure as CEO is the end of an era and an opportunity to try and grasp just exactly what it is he did and what lessons there are for all of us "trying to make a dent in the universe." Read More
— Computers

Steve Jobs steps down as CEO of Apple

By - August 25, 2011 1 Picture
In what was not an entirely surprising move, Steve Jobs announced yesterday that he has resigned as Chief Executive Officer of Apple. While neither Jobs nor Apple gave a reason for his resignation, it is widely suspected that his ongoing health problems played a major part in his decision. He will remain with the company as Chairman of the Board, while former Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook has taken over as CEO, in accordance with Jobs’ recommendation. Read More
— Good Thinking

Macrovision responds to Steve Jobs’ Open Letter on DRM

By - February 18, 2007 1 Picture
February 19, 2007 A fortnight ago we wrote about Steve Jobs’ provocative open letter on Digital Rights Management and the extraordinary reaction to the letter. In the interests of fairness, there is another viewpoint and in our humble opinion, the best presented counter to Jobs’ position is presented by DRM specialist Macrovision. Macrovision has been in the content protection industry for more than 20 years, working closely with content owners of many types, including the major Hollywood studios, to help navigate the transition from physical to digital distribution. The company has been involved with and has supported both prevention technologies and DRM that are on literally billions of copies of music, movies, games, software and other content forms, as well as hundreds of millions of devices across the world. Macrovision CEO & President Fred Amoroso penned the response. Wikipedia offers perspective on the issue with links to all the stakeholder groups, and the illustration comes from here. Via Slashdot Read More
— Music

Steve Jobs on DRM (Digital Rights Management)

By - February 6, 2007 1 Picture
February 7, 2007 With the big four record companies making a majority of their profits from completely insecure CDs that can be turned into MP3s and uploaded onto the Internet in less than half an hour, when does it become ridiculous for them insist on locking up their digital sales with restrictive DRM that hinders the rights of the paid user, while doing nothing to hinder piracy? Steve Jobs is the latest to throw his opinion in the ring - and coming from the only success story of the digital music era, his words are sure to turn heads. Read More
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