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— Aircraft

New stealth material could defeat latest radar systems

Stealth aircraft like the F35 fighter generally rely on high-tech absorption materials and unusual geometries to scatter, deflect, and sponge up incoming radar signals. These techniques are exceptionally good at masking a vehicle's shape and size, particularly when swept with side-scanning radar. However, with lower-frequency, directed anti-stealth radar-targeting systems being developed, these surfaces prove much less able to hide an object. To help address this, a team of Chinese scientists has developed a thin electronic material that sheaths an object and effectively absorbs radar signals over a wide range of frequencies.

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— Motorcycles

DARPA commissions a military "stealth motorcycle"

An elite team of commandos zip across rough enemy terrain, on motorcycles that produce no engine noise, yet that also have more range than pure electric bikes ... That's a scenario that DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) would like to make real. To that end, it recently gave a small business innovation research grant to Logos Technologies, to develop the bikes. Read More
— Architecture

Secret Operation 610 – scary mobile art that doubles as a laboratory

Rolling out of a hangar on the former Soesterberg Air Base in Utrecht, The Netherlands, is a black, angular shape that looks like a stealth hermit crab crossed with an airport waiting lounge. This combination of mobile sculpture and laboratory, called Secret Operation 610, was unveiled on September 13 as part of the Festival de Basis. It was built in collaboration by Rietveld Landscape, Studio Frank Havermans, and Koos Schaart over an 18-year period. Read More

Iran unveils homegrown Qaher F-313 "stealth" fighter

Iranian State TV on Saturday showed an unveiling ceremony for what the Iran Defense Ministry claims is a new Iranian designed and built combat aircraft. Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi said the single-seat Qaher F-313 (Dominant F-313) can operate at low altitudes and was constructed from “advanced materials” that contribute to the aircraft’s “very low radar cross section.” Read More