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Space

New research may improve the accuracy of "cosmic yardsticks"

Astronomers have discovered evidence that could help solve a long standing dispute over the origin of Type Ia supernovae, by observing the youngest example of the titanic explosions located to date. The light from the rare breed of supernovae is used by scientists as a cosmic yard stick to chart the expansion of our universe.Read More

Space

Our Sun could get angrier than we thought

Fresh research has revealed that powerful solar storms known as "superflares" are generated via the same process as common solar flares produced by our Sun. These superflares are capable of posing a significant threat to our advanced technology, and seriously harming Earth's protective ozone layer.Read More

Space

A better model for star aging

Working out the age of any given star in the night sky can be a very difficult task, and estimates are easier to make based on readings from groups rather than individual objects. A new model might significantly improve the situation, providing a conceptual framework to explain the rotation of stars, the intensity of their stellar winds and their X-ray emissions, arriving at a much more accurate estimate of age.Read More

Space

First observed shockwave to shed light on supernovas

As the late Carl Sagan said, "we are made of star stuff." The question is, where did this star stuff come from? The answer may be a bit nearer now that an international team of astronomers has for the first time captured the initial few minutes of a pair of supernovae as they exploded, as well as the first recorded supernova shockwave. According to the scientists, this could give us a better understanding of how many of the elements formed that make up the Earth and us.Read More

Space

A preview of the beautiful way our sun will die

This week the European Space Agency dug up one of the final images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), to provide a preview of the end of the world. This star is all but gone now, but was once roughly the same mass as our sun. Read More

Space

Astronomers discover massive storm raging on distant star

A team of astronomers making use of data collected by NASA's Kepler telescope has spotted a leviathan storm raging on the surface of a tiny, distant star. The storm, which is believed to be comfortably large enough to swallow three Earth-sized planets within its expanse, is comprised of clouds of tiny minerals and is thought to be similar in nature to Jupiter's "Great Red Spot".Read More

Space

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope sheds light on "alien megastructure" star

KIC 8462852 recently attracted a lot of attention owing to speculation that dramatic dips in the star's light that were detected in 2011 and 2013 by NASA's Kepler spacecraft were due to the presence of vast superstructures created by an advanced alien race. But a new study centering around analysis of data collected by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope suggests that the mysterious objects occulting the star KIC 8462852 aren't the creations of little green men, but in fact a family of comets.Read More

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