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Stars

Space

Where have all the red giants gone?

Computer simulations carried out by researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology may have discovered why older stars are suspiciously absent from the central region of our galaxy. Present day observations of the galactic center show it to be populated almost entirely by bright, young stars that are estimated to be only a few million years old, highlighting a startling lack of stellar diversity near the core of the Milky Way.Read More

Space

Now you can listen to 13 billion year-old stars

A team of astrophysicists from the University of Birmingham has successfully used Kepler data to capture the sounds emitted by ancient stars. The study focused on eight red giant stars, the smallest of which is many times the mass of our Sun, and almost three times its current age.Read More

Space

Was Planet 9 born of a different star?

A team of researchers from Lund University, Sweden, has run a series of computer simulations to test the likelihood that the as-of-yet undiscovered Planet 9 formed in the orbit of an alien star. Whilst the planet has not yet been directly observed, evidence of its gravitational influence may have been observed perturbing the orbits of six Kuiper Belt objects, leading some to assert that Planet 9 boasts a mass around 10 times that of Earth.Read More

Space

Newly-discovered "red geyser" galaxies may be responsible for galactic warming

An international team of scientists may have discovered the key to a phenomena known as "galactic warming," which is thought to be responsible for a dramatic drop-off in star production on galactic scales. Prior to the study, the cause of the warming was largely unknown, though it had been linked to the presence of the supermassive black holes lurking at the center of dormant galaxies.Read More

Space

Red dwarf exoplanets not as habitable as once believed

Fresh research is pouring cold water on the hopes of discovering life on distant exoplanets orbiting red dwarf stars. It had previously been thought that Earth-sized planets orbiting in the habitable zones (HZs) of the small stars could provide a possible haven for life, but sophisticated computer models suggest that these planets are likely rendered uninhabitable by their super-dense atmospheres.Read More

Space

Herschel zooms in on region of chaotic star formation

A newly-released image taken by the now decommissioned Herschel Space Observatory displays the complex and chaotic structure of the Vulpecula OB1 star formation region. The tumultuous scene, revealed thanks to the infrared capabilities of the Herschel telescope, was captured as part of the Hi-GAL project, which was responsible for imaging the entirety of the galactic plane in five distinct infrared wavelengths.
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Space

Could life exist around ancient red giant stars?

According to a study carried out by researchers from Cornell University, aged red giant stars could harbor exoplanets suited to the evolution of extraterrestrial life. The team used advanced stellar evolution models to estimate the boundaries of the habitable zones (HZ) of post main sequence (MS) ancient red giant stars, taking into account a wide range of stellar ages and properties.Read More

Journey toward Milky Way's dark heart in new Hubble video

Do you have 37 seconds of time to spare today? If so, you can zip towards the very center of our galaxy thanks to a new video put out by the Hubble Space Telescope team. The video is really just a long zoom into an image released last month, but it definitely provides the sensation of heading through our galactic core to the black hole that lies at its center.Read More

Space

The cosmos created from cinnamon, spice and ... cat hair?

For most of us, spilling some sugar or cinnamon on the glass of our scanner would be an accident. For photographer Navid Barraty, it's art. Barraty uses ordinary food, kitchen staples and other odd bits and pieces along with his Epson scanner to create enchanting cosmic worlds. Pancakes become planets, potatoes become asteroids and cat fur – yes cat fur – helps create a striking nebula. Have a look at this new series and see if you can guess what the images are comprised of – before you read the captions. Read More

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