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Stars

Space

Herschel zooms in on region of chaotic star formation

A newly-released image taken by the now decommissioned Herschel Space Observatory displays the complex and chaotic structure of the Vulpecula OB1 star formation region. The tumultuous scene, revealed thanks to the infrared capabilities of the Herschel telescope, was captured as part of the Hi-GAL project, which was responsible for imaging the entirety of the galactic plane in five distinct infrared wavelengths.
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Space

Could life exist around ancient red giant stars?

According to a study carried out by researchers from Cornell University, aged red giant stars could harbor exoplanets suited to the evolution of extraterrestrial life. The team used advanced stellar evolution models to estimate the boundaries of the habitable zones (HZ) of post main sequence (MS) ancient red giant stars, taking into account a wide range of stellar ages and properties.Read More

Journey toward Milky Way's dark heart in new Hubble video

Do you have 37 seconds of time to spare today? If so, you can zip towards the very center of our galaxy thanks to a new video put out by the Hubble Space Telescope team. The video is really just a long zoom into an image released last month, but it definitely provides the sensation of heading through our galactic core to the black hole that lies at its center.Read More

Space

The cosmos created from cinnamon, spice and ... cat hair?

For most of us, spilling some sugar or cinnamon on the glass of our scanner would be an accident. For photographer Navid Barraty, it's art. Barraty uses ordinary food, kitchen staples and other odd bits and pieces along with his Epson scanner to create enchanting cosmic worlds. Pancakes become planets, potatoes become asteroids and cat fur – yes cat fur – helps create a striking nebula. Have a look at this new series and see if you can guess what the images are comprised of – before you read the captions. Read More

Space

New research may improve the accuracy of "cosmic yardsticks"

Astronomers have discovered evidence that could help solve a long standing dispute over the origin of Type Ia supernovae, by observing the youngest example of the titanic explosions located to date. The light from the rare breed of supernovae is used by scientists as a cosmic yard stick to chart the expansion of our universe.Read More

Space

Our Sun could get angrier than we thought

Fresh research has revealed that powerful solar storms known as "superflares" are generated via the same process as common solar flares produced by our Sun. These superflares are capable of posing a significant threat to our advanced technology, and seriously harming Earth's protective ozone layer.Read More

Space

A better model for star aging

Working out the age of any given star in the night sky can be a very difficult task, and estimates are easier to make based on readings from groups rather than individual objects. A new model might significantly improve the situation, providing a conceptual framework to explain the rotation of stars, the intensity of their stellar winds and their X-ray emissions, arriving at a much more accurate estimate of age.Read More

Space

First observed shockwave to shed light on supernovas

As the late Carl Sagan said, "we are made of star stuff." The question is, where did this star stuff come from? The answer may be a bit nearer now that an international team of astronomers has for the first time captured the initial few minutes of a pair of supernovae as they exploded, as well as the first recorded supernova shockwave. According to the scientists, this could give us a better understanding of how many of the elements formed that make up the Earth and us.Read More

Space

A preview of the beautiful way our sun will die

This week the European Space Agency dug up one of the final images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), to provide a preview of the end of the world. This star is all but gone now, but was once roughly the same mass as our sun. Read More

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