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Special forces

The entry of ASIS into the amphibious market will greatly increase the global supply of am...

NZ-based Sealegs has begun licensing its amphibious boat technology. Already the world's largest amphibian manufacturer, Sealegs' first licensee under the "Powered by Sealegs" scheme is Dubai-based ASIS Boats, one of the world's largest manufacturers of Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats. Sealegs current motorized, retractable and steerable wheeled system is suitable for boats up to 2.5 tonnes, but the company will launch an entirely new system suitable for boats up to 6.5 tonnes in June. ASIS will offer Sealegs amphibious technology across its entire range of recreational, commercial and military boats up to 12 meters. Gizmag spoke with Sealegs' CEO David Glen to get an outline the company's development plans.  Read More

Vespa's 150 TAP (Troupes Aéro Portées) was designed to be dropped into battle by parachute...

For motorcyclists wishing to balance the inequities of the road-going pecking order, this could be the perfect mount. Vespa's 150 TAP might only be good for 40 mph, but the integrated M20 light anti-armor cannon shoots 75 mm rounds capable of penetrating 100 mm of armor from four miles.  Read More

The FlatEvac (right) allows soldiers to maintain readiness (Photo: Michael Alvarez-Pereyre...

After introducing a hands-free "human backpack", Israeli tactical gear manufacturer Agilite is back with a hands-free solution that allows injured troops to lie flat and be carried to safety. Unlike other stretchers that keep the hands occupied, the FlatEvac sets both hands free. Troops are able to handle their weapons, navigation instruments and other tools while simultaneously carrying their injured battle mate.  Read More

USAF special forces on a training mission

Most people have experienced the sonic boom of a skillfully wielded whip, or the closely related crack of a nearby bolt of lightning. Such sounds have a character that attracts a good deal of attention, which is why the US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is trying to silence them. The crack of a rifle shot is the sonic boom of a supersonic bullet, making stealthy ground missions difficult to accomplish. To address this need, SOCOM has issued a Small Business Innovation Research request for proposal (SBIR-RFP) for a feasibility study of suitable subsonic rounds.  Read More

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