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Speaker

Party on the patio with the inMotion Air universal wireless speaker from Altec Lansing

Altec Lansing has come to the rescue of music lovers who like the idea of streaming music wirelessly around the home, but can't afford to invest in systems from Olive or Sonos, or who don't want to be shackled to Apple Air or iOS devices. The inMotion Air universal wireless speaker can pump out any audio stored on a computer up to 333 feet away via an included adapter, while mobile devices can also supply the music via Bluetooth. Audio enhancement technology offers CD-quality performance, regardless of source compression encoding.  Read More

JAMBOX in blue

Jawbone, a company better known for its Bluetooth headsets, has now released a Bluetooth speaker system that makes use of two powerful acoustic drivers and ultra-small speakers that work in concert with an innovative moving-wall passive bass radiator and airtight enclosure. The company says this is the first time this technology has been seen in a personal speaker system and delivers more punch than you'd expect from such a small unit.  Read More

Built using high-end components and advanced signal processing of the kind normally reserv...

Danish audio innovator Libratone has been showing off its first consumer product at this year's IFA Consumer Electronics Show in Berlin. The Beat is a high-end wireless speaker that promises listeners an audio sweet spot wherever they may be in a room. An iPod, iPhone or iPad is connected to a wireless transmitter which sends an audio signal to the speaker, then FullRoom technology reflects the sound off the room's walls to provide 360 degrees of sonic enjoyment. So does it live up to its promise? Gizmag stopped by to check it out.  Read More

One of the sound-generating carbon nanotube sheets

Two years ago, Chinese scientists coated one side of a flag with a thin sheet of nanotubes, then played a song using the flapping sheet-coated flag as a speaker. It was a demonstration of flexible speaker technology, in which nanotubes can be made to generate sound waves via a thermoacoustic effect – every time an electrical pulse is sent through the microscopic layer of nanotubes, it causes the air around them to heat up, which in turn creates a sound wave. Now, an American scientist has taken that technology underwater, where he claims it could allow submariners to detect other submarines, and to remain hidden themselves.  Read More

Magnepan's new MG1.7 audiophile speakers, for the first time using quasi-ribbon technology...

It's been a good while since Magnepan International updated its audiophile-pleasing and critically-acclaimed Magneplanar 1.6 speakers and the new model marks a technology departure for the company. For over 40 years, Magnepan has used planar magnetic drivers for the bass or lower midrange in its speakers but with the Maggie 1.7's the company has switched all the speaker drivers to something called quasi-ribbon technology.  Read More

Murata has created the world's first waterproof, ultra-thin piezoelectric speaker for inst...

Waterproofing mobile devices such as phones, MP3 players and cameras is becoming ever more common. But devices sporting little holes to let the sound out pose a bit of a leakage problem. Rather than potentially reduce sound quality by covering them up, Murata has produced a tiny piezoelectric speaker which is itself waterproof.  Read More

Prof. Dr. Fritz Sennheiser (9 May 1912 to 17 May 2010) in front of Laboratory W where he f...

To any who work in audio or communications, the name Sennheiser is synonymous with the absolute top quality in sound; indeed there are many who wouldn't dream of using anything less. So it is with regret that this year the industry loses the founding father of the brand, Fritz Sennheiser, who died on May 17th a few days after his 98th birthday.  Read More

The 13th Man lets you listen at your table to your chosen sports program being shown on a ...

Even if your lip-reading skills are first-rate (mine are absolute rubbish) you’ll still struggle to ever comfortably watch sport on TV in a pub or club if you can’t hear the commentary when the sound is either turned off because not everyone wants to listen, or it’s the audio of another sports channel you’re not watching, or the ambient noise of the venue is drowning out every word. Australian University of Technology student Tim McBride knows first-hand how frustrating it can be to sit down to watch your sporting heroes strut their stuff and not be able to closely follow the game. He invented The 13th Man (an extra, extra man in the game of cricket) that is a personal wireless speaker unit that sits atop your table and lets you listen to your favorite game. McBride’s invention is another shortlisted submission in our ongoing series of the Australian Design Awards - James Dyson Award 2010.  Read More

My Pet Speaker is a sound system that eliminates high and low frequencies in music to cate...

Love your music but can’t understand why it sends your cat or dog flying out of the room? Well, apparently it’s because your furry friend hears the high and low frequencies in sounds that the human ear can’t detect – so playing your favorite tunes can really irritate, disturb or even scare your pet. Here’s a clever solution that could soon have you both in auditory heaven - the My Pet Speaker. It reduces the unsettling frequencies of music - so it’s gentle on your pet’s ears - and lets you still enjoy the music you love.  Read More

The Hi-Fido audio speaker

Product designer Matteo Cibic has come up with a very distinctive desktop speaker in the aptly named Hi-Fido. Shaped like a headless dog wearing an Elizabethan collar, Hi-Fido sports a 150-watt speaker that “uses the acoustic properties of ceramic to diffuse the high quality sound with a bass reflex system”.  Read More

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