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Sound


— Environment

ROV assesses thickness of oil slicks from underneath

When people are attempting to clean up oil spills at sea, one of the key things they need to know is the amount of oil that's been spilled – among other things, this will determine the amount of dispersant or other agents that are used. In order to make that process easier and more accurate, scientists from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science have developed a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that does the job by measuring the thickness of oil slicks from below the surface. Read More
— Music

KT Platform Tactile Monitor lets players get a real feel for the music

Nearly 3 years ago, we told you about a system from the UK's Porter & Davies that helped drummers feel the low end thunder they were kicking out by shaking the very stool they sat on. Now the company has extended the technology to other members of the band with the launch of the KT Platform Tactile Monitor, which is said to transmit sound to the player by kinetic transfer, promising that you will "literally feel it in your bones." Read More
— Physics

New acoustic levitation device goes out of alignment to expand potential applications

Acoustic levitators are already pretty intriguing devices, in that they use opposing sound waves to suspend small objects in mid-air. Now, however, scientists from Brazil's University of São Paulo have created what they claim is a better acoustic levitator. It's less fussy about the exact orientation of its components, making it more feasible for use in practical applications. Read More
— Science

Sound-steered cyborg cockroaches could help save human lives

If you're ever trapped in a collapsed building and are calling for help, you might want to think twice before squashing any cockroaches that wander your way – one of them might have been sent to find you. Researchers from North Carolina State University are currently laying the groundwork for such a scenario, by getting cyborg-like "biobot" cockroaches to move towards sounds. Down the road, such insects may be used to locate victims at disaster sites. Read More
— Music

Korg's Cliphit turns everyday objects into an impromptu drum kit

Many of us find ourselves tapping our fingers on desks or tabletops at any and every opportunity. It doesn't matter whether or not we've ever actually held a drumstick, if we have a rhythm in our head and a hand free we'll tap out a beat on whatever surface is within reach. We have already seen attempts to turn this from an annoying habit into a way of making something approaching real music, such as the Wavedrum and the TableDrum, but Korg has now upped the ante with Cliphit. Read More
— Electronics

Mobile phones could be charged using sound

Four years ago, we first heard about how Korean scientists had proposed using sound to charge mobile phones. They explained that it could be done via a piezoelectric effect, in which zinc oxide nanowires converted sound-caused vibrations into electricity. At the time, the researchers couldn't generate enough of a current to actually charge a phone. Now, however, scientists from Nokia and Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have succeeded in doing so. Read More
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