2014 Paris Motor Show highlights

Soccer

Trick Kick challenges mini-footballers to go head to head

Can't get your proper fill of football (or, if your prefer, soccer) by living vicariously through the Ronaldos and Messis of the world? Consider table foosball frat boy play? Perhaps the new Trick Kick mini soccer game will do the ... trick. Billed as the world's one and only original indoor mini kick soccer game, Trick Kick provides a new way of experiencing the world's most popular sport.  Read More

Deft ball control is at the core of this game's appeal

Soccer isn’t called the “world game” on a whim. It is the biggest football code on the planet with fans and players hailing from all corners of the globe. The game is also the most popular video game in the ball sports genre, and with good reason. It is fun, has tactical depth and is usually pretty thrilling to play – and it's in the gameplay stakes that Pro Evolution Soccer 2013 on the Xbox 360 shines.  Read More

An experimental combined system allows soccer coaches to instantly obtain multi-camera vid...

You could certainly be forgiven for thinking that Muithu and Bagadus sound like character names from an H.P. Lovecraft story. In fact, they’re complimentary systems that have been combined to help soccer coaches record multi-camera videos of key game moments – using their smartphone – for later or instantaneous review.  Read More

Team NimbRo hopes that by providing an open-source hardware platform, more universities wi...

RoboCup soccer provides a fascinating window into the current state-of-the-art in robotics and artificial intelligence. However, building robots much taller than a garden gnome has proven a daunting requirement for university labs with limited budgets and experience. Just five teams qualified to compete in the mid-range TeenSize category this year, for robots three to four feet (95-120 cm) tall. A new open-source hardware platform from the University of Bonn's Team NimbRo fills the gap for newcomers and veterans alike.  Read More

Tactical Pad was developed by Brazilian software engineers to aid soccer coaches in the te...

Brazil is a soccer-mad country. As the host country of the upcoming 2014 World Cup, it is even more obsessed with the beautiful game. The love for the sport permeates Brazilian culture and has reached the labs of software engineers, who have created a virtual platform to replace the traditional tactic boards used by coaches to analyze and improve strategies for players.  Read More

Hawk-Eye goal-line technology will be trialled at an international friendly association fo...

The international football friendly (the association kind) between England and Belgium scheduled for June 2 may not be burning a hole in your diary, but it will be notable in at least one respect. The match, to be held at London's Wembley Stadium, will be the highest profile match to date to make use of so-called goal-line technology, designed to detect whether or not the ball has crossed the line (and therefore whether a goal should be given). The goals at Wembley have been fitted with a Hawk-Eye system similar to those now officially used to assist umpires in tennis and cricket. However, though the system will be up and running for the entire match, it will not be used to help adjudicate in the event of a difficult goal-line decision.  Read More

The Lusail Iconic Stadium surrounded by solar collectors

As part of Qatar’s bid for the 2022 World Cup, the London-based architects responsible for the 2007 reconstruction of Wembley Stadium, Foster + Partners, has designed an energy efficient stadium to be built in the Qatar capital of Doha. When completed, the Lusail Iconic Stadium will boast enough room for 86,250 spectators and will be surrounded by parking and service areas shaded by canopies of solar collectors, which will produce energy for the stadium when it’s in use, as well as generating power for neighboring buildings.  Read More

The Greendix solar-powered soccer balls

There are obviously some people out there who think that soccer balls aren’t doing enough. Earlier this year, we told you about the sOccket, a ball that generates power as it gets kicked around. Now, word comes to us of soccer ball prototypes with built-in solar panels. Where the black pentagonal sections would normally be, these balls instead have custom-designed panels that gather energy as they bask in the sun. That energy is used for running onboard motion sensors, and audio devices that emit a tracking sound whenever the balls are kicked. It is hoped that this sort of technology could be used to allow visually-impaired people to play soccer in the future.  Read More

EyeTV can now filter out much of the annoying droning on World Cup broadcasts thanks to a ...

With FIFA President, Sepp Blatter, defending the rights of South African fans to blow their horns at World Cup matches, TV viewers have turned to technology to tone down the incessant buzzing that accompanies the on field action of World Cup TV coverage. In what is sure to be music to the ears of many of the users of Elgato’s EyeTV software, the company has announced a free update that features a Vuvuzela Filter.  Read More

A fan plays the 'instrument' that has become the sound of the 2010 World Cup - the vuvuzel...

Riddle me this. What sounds like an elephant when all alone, but sounds like a swarm of bees when numbers grow? The answer, as any World Cup aficionado will tell you, is the vuvuzela. A meter long plastic horn that has become synonymous with the 2011 World Cup in South Africa and has had many fans reaching for the mute button on their TV remote controls. The BBC has received so many complaints it is looking at ways to minimize the noise of the so-called instrument. Now researchers at the Centre for Digital Music (C4DM) at Queen Mary, University of London have come up with a "devuvuzelator" that filters out the droning sounds of vuvuzela for anyone watching the World Cup on a computer.  Read More

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