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Snow

Outdoors

Quebec students aim to develop a more authentic snow bike

Over the years, various manufacturers and inventors have tried different ways of putting "two wheels" to the snow. The rise of fat-tired mountain bikes, not to mention extreme Antarctic fat trikes, has been the biggest news in this area, but we've also seen recreational equipment like the KTrak and BikeBoards. A group of mechanical engineering students at Quebec's University of Sherbrooke is developing a new solution that aims for a smoother downhill ride by combining elements of existing winter bikes.Read More

Outdoors

SnoSoot wearable sled ready to shred snow

Either people are getting a lot more serious about sledding, or there are a number of companies that are going to be out some money. Over the past few years, we've seen a growing number of sleds that approach, even exceed, skiing and snowboarding gear in terms of technology and price. The latest to come to our attention, the SnoSoot, offers a unique twist. It's a wearable that transforms you into a human snow-surfing machine. Read More

Good Thinking

Advanced Rail Cleaner blasts snow and ice off railway tracks

Imagine if you were trying to pull a heavy sled up an icy hill, while wearing slick-soled boots. Well, that's kind of what it's like for locomotives working on snowy mountain railways. If there's too much ice or snow on the rails, their steel wheels will just spin out when traveling up inclines. Because of this problem, trains going along such routes are generally kept short and light – which isn't cost-effective. Now, however, GE Transportation has developed a supersonic air blower to keep those tracks dry. Read More

Automotive

Prototype electric vehicle passes first test on road to Antarctica

The Venturi Antarctica, a prototype electric vehicle designed to tackle the harsh climes of Antarctica recently completed its first test drive in the Southern Alps of Europe. Manufactured by Venturi Automobiles, the joystick-controlled prototype seats five and can reach a top speed of 25 km/h (15 mph) on snow tracks and 45 km/h (27 mph) on wheels. When fully developed, the electric vehicle will allow scientists to drive to research sites without any risk of contaminating the samples to be collected.Read More

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