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Smartphones

Close-ups taken using a regular smartphone camera's digital zoom (left), and with the Core...

Although people may speak about zooming in with smartphone cameras, what they're doing isn't actual "zooming" in the telephoto-lens sense of the word. That's because almost all phone cameras just have a digital zoom, meaning that in order to get in closer on the subject, the phone just enlarges the pixels from the middle of the frame. The result is a grainy, crappy photo. While it is possible to squeeze optical zoom lenses into phones, Tel Aviv University spinoff company Corephotonics has developed a sleeker solution, that utilizes the combined output of two compact lenses.  Read More

LG's new F70 4G LTE smartphone

LG is looking to make a strong push into the 4G LTE smartphone market with the release of its new F70 smartphone. The device will go on sale in Europe first in the first half of May, then it will release in Asia, Central America, South America, and North America.  Read More

Gizmag goes hands-on to compare the Apple iPhone 5s and Samsung Galaxy S5

There are lots of great smartphones out there, but you won't find two more popular names than iPhone and Galaxy. How do the latest versions of these two flagships compare? Join Gizmag for a hands-on look at the Apple iPhone 5s and Samsung Galaxy S5.  Read More

Here's some tips to get you started with Windows Phone 8.1

Microsoft is continuing to improve its Windows Phone mobile OS, and Windows Phone 8.1 brings a slew of new features and settings. This is a major update that really makes it feel like a more complete smartphone platform. Here's a list of some helpful tips to get you started using some of the main new features.  Read More

The new Life Pure XL from Blu Products

Miami-based Blu Products has unleashed a new 5.5-inch display smartphone that's reported to include market-leading processing, memory, display and camera tech. The Life Pure XL is built around Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800 mobile processor, which gets support from up to 3 GB of RAM, and features a 16 MP rear-facing camera with a compact camera-like image sensor and an AF selfie snapper to the front.  Read More

Lunecase runs off of electromagnetic energy emitted by the iPhone

Smartphone cases are so common that you can pick one up at the supermarket checkout stand, so for one to stand out, it needs something more than a print of a cartoon kitten. Built by Concepter, a company based in Kiev, Ukraine, the Lunecase is s a batteryless, wireless phone case that not only interacts with an iPhone, but also powers itself from the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the device.  Read More

SGP Technologies has released updated tech specs for its security-focused Blackphone

SGP Technologies has released updated tech specs for its Blackphone, a smartphone designed with user privacy in mind. The device was unveiled at Mobile World Congress in February as a secure smartphone for the mass market.  Read More

The PiPhone from software engineer and photographer Dave Hunt

Since its launch and slightly delayed shipping in 2012, we've seen Raspberry Pi computers used for everything from a bartender to robots to a bizarre musical instrument. Now dedicated tinkerer Dave Hunt has used a Model B to create a touchscreen smartphone called the PiPhone, though he readily admits that it would be easier and cheaper to pick up an (arguably much better looking) budget cellphone from a shop in the mall, "but hey, where’s the fun in that."  Read More

The PaperFold smartphone prototype allows up to three separate E-Ink displays to be combin...

Long before Korean electronics giants LG and Samsung rolled out smartphones with curved displays in the form of the G Flex and Galaxy Round, the team from the Human Media Lab at Canada's Queen's University created the Paperphone, a fully-functioning flexible smartphone prototype featuring a thin film E-Ink display. This was followed by the PaperTab tablet and MorePhone smartphone prototypes. Now the foldable PaperFold smartphone has joined the fold.  Read More

The tiny imperfections in each smartphone's sensors leave a unique fingerprint in its shar...

Security-conscious smartphone users may decline apps' requests to "use your current location," but according to research conducted at the University of Illinois, doing so still doesn't mean that those users can't be tracked. This is because each phone's sensors – such as the accelerometer – have a unique "fingerprint." By identifying that fingerprint in sensor data sent from the phone, third parties could at the very least keep track of what the user is doing at what time.  Read More

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