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The BitLock is a smartphone-activated bike lock

Consumers now have their choice of several smartphone-controlled door locks, which allow users to grant access to select people, and that automatically cause the door to unlock when a user approaches. San Francisco-based startup Mesh Motion has taken those same ideas, and applied them to a bicycle security device known as the BitLock.  Read More

Gizmag compares the features and specs of the HTC One max and Galaxy Note 3 phablets

It seems like everyone is making a phablet these days. HTC is the latest to get in on the super-sizing action, with its humongous version of the HTC One, the One max. How does it compare to the current phablet prototype, the Galaxy Note 3? Read on, as Gizmag compares the latest giant-sized phones from HTC and Samsung.  Read More

HTC's new One max takes many of the features of the One, and puts them in a gigantic body

This year, HTC released what we considered to be one of the best smartphones ever made, in the HTC One. Then, a few months later, the Taiwanese company tried to appease lovers of smaller phones, with the One mini. Today HTC completed its One trifecta, as it pulled back the curtain on its first phablet, the HTC One max.  Read More

The Hammerhead is a bicycle navigation device that uses LEDs to indicate where riders shou...

It's becoming more and more common for cyclists to find their way around using navigation apps on bike-mounted smartphones ... but it's not a perfect setup. For one thing, those phones get shaken around a lot. Additionally, it's risky for cyclists to keep glancing down at the screen, plus keeping that screen constantly awake uses up a lot of battery life. The Hammerhead offers an alternative. It's a water- and shock-proof bar-mounted device that relays simple navigational cues via easy-to-see LEDs.  Read More

Monsieur uses an intuitive touchscreen

Want to serve cocktails at your next party, but don’t know beans about mixology? The Monsieur company of Atlanta, Georgia thinks it has the answer with the home version of its Monsieur machine. It’s a robotic bartender tailored to your individual lifestyle that the company sees as a way of enhancing social drinking without having to constantly refer to a book or acting as bartender all night at a party. We caught up with co-founder and CEO of Monsieur, Barry Givens, to discuss the machine-made cocktail.  Read More

The KnowRoaming sticker is attached to the user's SIM card using an included applicator

It's a pretty common experience – you get back from a trip to another country, and discover that you racked up huge roaming fees while you were there. While one alternative is to just not use your phone when abroad, Toronto start-up KnowRoaming is now offering another: an electronic sticker that is said to reduce roaming fees by up to 85 percent.  Read More

UCLA scientists have developed a smartphone attachment that acts as a subwavelength micros...

A team of engineers at UCLA has created a 3D-printed attachment that enables smartphone cameras to image particles as small as 90 nanometers. This marks the first time that single nanoparticles and viruses have been detected using a cellphone-based imaging system.  Read More

After a series of leaks, Samsung made the Galaxy Round, with its curved AMOLED display, of...

Apparently some big companies have decided that curved displays are the next big thing. Just a few days after LG told us about its upcoming flexible displays, Samsung has done one better by announcing its first phone with a flexible display, the Galaxy Round.  Read More

Gizmag goes hands on, to revisit the latest iPhone and Galaxy flagships

Comparing the iPhone 5s to the Galaxy S4 isn't really all that different from comparing the iPhone 5 to the Galaxy S4. But the 5s does offer a few key upgrades over its predecessor, so we thought it was worth busting out the microscope to revisit Apple's and Samsung's flagships. How do the 5s' new fingerprint sensor, A7 chip, and improved camera stack up next to the GS4? Join Gizmag, as we go hands-on, to pit the iPhone 5s against the Galaxy S4.  Read More

Anagog monitors users' smartphones to determine when they've left a parking spot, so it ca...

Yep, we've all been there – you leave your home in plenty of time to drive to an event, but end up being late because you spend such a long time looking for parking once you get there. Well, Israeli entrepreneur Yaron Aizenbud has created something that could make such parking-spot-searches considerably shorter. It's called Anagog, and it's a smartphone-based system that shows users where the open spots are, or even where spots are soon to be open. And unlike some other proposed systems, it doesn't require any hardware to be installed in the existing infrastructure.  Read More

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