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Skin Cancer

Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) image of the ozone hole over Antarctica in Septemb...

A new report suggests that international efforts to halt the destruction of the ozone layer have been successful. Launched on the UN International Day for Preservation of the Ozone Layer, the report by 300 scientists also provides new information about the net effects on Earth's climate, and also the effects of climate change on the ozone later moving forward.  Read More

Hollow microneedles open the door to new techniques for diagnosing and treating a variety ...

A research team at North Carolina State University has created incredibly small microneedles to be used in the treatment of medical conditions by inserting nanoscale dyes called quantum dots into the skin. This new procedure could advance a doctor’s ability to diagnose and treat a variety of conditions, including skin cancer.  Read More

Solariums significantly increase the risk of skin cancer

Ever since the 1920s, getting a tan has been highly fashionable in many Western cultures. Despite the growing mountain of evidence regarding the dangers, many (mainly young) people continue to use solariums as a way to attain what is often seen as a “healthy tan.” However, the evidence just keeps piling up with two new studies out of Australia, home of the “bronzed Aussie,” showing that using a solarium significantly raises ones chances of being diagnosed with skin cancer and that the risks increase as the age of solarium use decreases.  Read More

The 3D high clarity image of melanoma produced using the new imaging technique

Even though melanoma is one of the less common types of skin cancer, it accounts for the majority of skin cancer deaths – around 75 percent. The five-year survival rate for early stage melanoma is very high (98 percent), but the rate drops precipitously if the cancer is detected late or there is recurrence. So a great deal rides on the accuracy of the initial surgery, where the goal is to remove as little tissue as possible while obtaining “clean margins” all around the tumor. So far no imaging technique has been up to the task of defining the melanoma's boundaries accurately enough to guide surgery – until now.  Read More

Johns Hopkins researchers are testing an infrared scanning system to detect melanoma (Imag...

Although melanoma is one of the less common types of skin cancer, it is responsible for the majority (around 75 percent) of skin cancer related deaths. Part of the problem is that current diagnoses rely on subjective clues such as size, shape and coloring of a mole. With the aim of providing an objective measurement as to whether a lesion may be malignant, researchers at John Hopkins University have developed a prototype non-invasive infrared scanning system that works by looking for the tiny temperature difference between healthy tissue and a growing tumor.  Read More

Partial view of a gold nanosphere magnified by a factor of one billion. The darker ring sh...

March 24, 2009 A minimally invasive therapy that could help fight cancer may be on its way with the development of the first hollow gold nanospheres that actively search for and burn tumors. Researchers believe the new technique could prove particularly effective against malignant Melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer responsible for around 48,000 deaths worldwide each year... and numbers are growing.  Read More

EWG analysis of ingredients in 806 name-brand sunscreens, based on a review of publicly av...

August 9, 2007 In sun-drenched regions the skin protection message has been strongly delivered for years: overexposure equals skin cancer. Despite the warnings to cover up the Skin Cancer Foundation warns that more than 600,000 new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year in the U.S. and skin cancer is responsible for 8,500 deaths annually. Paradoxically, suncreens themselves have been identified as a contributing factor in this dilemma, with new products like UV Natural promoting themselves as a safe alternative to other creams on the market which may be doing more harm than good in the ongoing battle against the sun’s harmful rays.  Read More

New insight into skin-tanning process suggests novel way of preventing skin cancer

October 9, 2006 Though synthetic images and contrived looks help to shape our ideas of what’s attractive and what’s passe, we suspect the suntanned look triggers recognition of a healthy, robust outdoorsy person and no matter what shape the Ozone Layer is in, the bronzed look is still likely to be fashionable for a long time yet. Which makes the following great news for the sun worshippers of the world. Findings from a study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children's Hospital in Boston have rewritten science's understanding of the process of skin tanning – an insight that has enabled them to develop a promising way of protecting fair-skinned people from skin cancer caused by exposure to sunlight.  Read More

As a global hotspot for skin cancer problems, its not surprising that Australia is at the forefront of research into UV protection for the skin. What is surprising is the technology being applied to this end...  Read More

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