Computational creativity and the future of AI

Simon Fraser University

Regine Gries has had to endure approximately 180,000 bedbug bites in the course of the res...

Having any amount of bedbugs in your home is not a good thing. The sooner that you know they're there, however, the easier it will be to exterminate all of them. With that in mind, scientists from Canada's Simon Fraser University have developed a method of luring the li'l bloodsuckers into traps, and then keeping them there so that their presence can be duly noted and addressed.  Read More

The Christmas tree in the center was 3D-printed in the traditional manner, and displays th...

If you haven't yet bought a Christmas tree yet, you may have left it a bit late. But don't despair: there's still time to print one. And a new 3D printer algorithm that claims to provide super-efficient 3D printing of Christmas trees with zero material waste may be just the ticket. Using a system of printing entitled "Approximate Pyramidal Shape Decomposition," the algorithm also promises a way to produce accurate molds for casting chocolate Santas and reindeer too.  Read More

Maintaining sugar levels in a brain protein known as tau could slow or prevent Alzheimer's...

We’ve reported on numerous different approaches by scientists looking to tackle Alzheimer’s disease. While some, such as the anticancer drug bexarotene and a compound known as J147, show great promise, there is still no approved treatment to slow the disease’s progression. The latest promising candidate for a treatment comes from Canada’s Simon Fraser University (SFU), where a team has concluded that ensuring that sugar levels in a brain protein known as tau are maintained could slow or prevent the fatal disease.  Read More

New technology is able to capture 3D images of muscle contractions in less time and more d...

Current medical imaging technology misses important data regarding muscle contraction, including the ways in which a muscle’s shape changes when it contracts, how the muscle bulges, and how its internal fibers become more curved ... or at least, so Simon Fraser University (SFU)’s associate professor James Wakeling tells us. In order to remedy that situation, he has developed a new method of imaging contracting muscles, that he claims should allow researchers to observe never-before-seen details of muscle activation.  Read More

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