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Ships

The purpose of the new jets is to increase the speed of the LCS while lowering running cos...

The U.S. Navy is fitting Rolls Royce water jets to its Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). The new water jets can pump out half a million gallons (1.9 million liters) of high-density seawater per minute, pushing the LCS at over 40 knots (46 mph, 74 km/h) while providing more power for less weight.  Read More

Zebra mussels fouling a marine sensor (Image: NOAA/Wikipedia)

Engineers at Duke University have developed a polymer that keeps ships’ bottoms clean by twitching like living skin. The paint-like material combats hull fouling by preventing marine organisms from collecting on hulls by physically moving on the microscopic level and thus dislodging bacteria from the surface without toxic chemicals.  Read More

The world's first car-carrying electric ferry is scheduled to begin operations in Norway, ...

Presently, the Norwegian villages of Lavik and Oppedal are linked by a ferry that burns about a million liters (264,172 US gallons) of diesel a year, emitting 570 tonnes (628 tons) of carbon dioxide and 15 tonnes (16.5 tons) of nitrogen oxides. That’s about to change, however, as it’s slated to be replaced by what is claimed to be the world’s first all-electric car-carrying ferry. Developed by Siemens and Norwegian shipyard Fjellstrand, the vessel can recharge its batteries in just ten minutes.  Read More

One of the test hulls, which had the electrochemical paint applied in select areas

Marine biofouling is the process in which organisms such as barnacles problematically colonize underwater surfaces. When it happens to the hulls of ships, the vessels become less hydrodynamic, having to burn more fuel in order to move through the water. Although hulls can be coated with paint that kills the offending organisms, that paint also releases toxic substances into the surrounding water. Now, however, scientists from Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials have developed a more environmentally-friendly paint, that uses electrolysis to control biofouling.  Read More

The M/V Aria, cruising the Amazon River in Peru

Tour operator Aqua Expeditions is an adventure travel company that offers guests the chance to cruise the Amazon River in Peru, while staying on board a 147-foot-long (45-meter) floating hotel. Designed by Peruvian architect Jordi Puig, the M/V Aria is an intimate cruise ship that can accommodate a maximum of 32 passengers, plus crew. The unique accommodation offers a rare chance to observe the wonders of the Amazon region from an unobstructed vantage point – be it from one of the ship’s numerous outdoor decks, or from the privacy of a guest suite.  Read More

The replica bridge at Britannia Royal Naval College Dartmouth

On-the-job training is not something you want to do with the bridge team of a frigate costing over a billion pounds, so the Royal Navy uses simulators to bring officers up to speed. The latest is a Photo-realistic warship bridge simulator installed at the Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), Dartmouth, England. This simulator uses computers to generate images so realistic that students often sway as the “ship” rolls, even though it’s sitting still.  Read More

USS Fife, a Spruance-class destroyer powered by gas turbines

Tell someone that you’ve invented a car that runs on water and they're liable to report you for fraud. That hasn’t stopped scientists and engineers at the U.S.. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) who want to run warships on seawater - or at least, to turn seawater into jet fuel. This may sound like they’ve been standing too close to the ether again, but the idea is to extract carbon dioxide and hydrogen from seawater and then convert these into jet fuel by a gas-to-liquids process. If this proves practical, American naval vessels could refuel themselves at sea.  Read More

A new additive based on glycerol helps reduce pollution in marine bunker fuel used in crui...

The bunker fuel used in cruise liners and freighters is some of the cheapest, crudest fuel available. It’s also among the dirtiest. Scientists from the Maine Maritime Academy and SeaChange Group LLC led by George N. Harakas, Ph.D announced at the 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society that they have developed what they call "Bunker Green" fuel. This fuel uses an ingredient commonly used in food and medicine to reduce sulfur and other emissions in ocean vessels.  Read More

The Type 26 Global Combat Ship (T26 GCS) that is due to enter service with the Royal Navy ...

The U.K.’s Ministry of Defence (MOD) has unveiled its new multi-mission warship - the Type 26 Global Combat Ship (T26 GCS). Due to replace the thirteen Type 23 frigates in Britain’s Royal Navy when it enters service in after 2020, the T26 GCS has been in development by the MOD and BAE Systems since 2010 and is intended for use in combat and counter-piracy operations as well as supporting humanitarian and disaster relief work around the world.  Read More

The Air Supported Vessel uses a cushion of air to increase speed and improve efficiency (I...

A European project is developing new Air Support Vessel (ASV) hull designs that allow watercraft to ride on a cushion of air to greatly reduce friction between the hull and the water, resulting in more hull speed for less power than conventional designs. The project is part of a EUR10,000,000 (approx. US$13,225,000) project funded in part by the European Union, the Norwegian Research Council and Innovation Norway, and Norwegian company Effect Ships International AS has recently completed tank-testing in Sweden of two ASV hull models.  Read More

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