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Ships

— Marine

New eco-hybrid fuel could help to reduce shipping pollution

By - March 31, 2014 7 Pictures
The EPA has identified pollution from ships as a contributing factor to respiratory problems and premature deaths suffered by residents of the US and Canada. As such, it is in the process of implementing stricter emissions standards for ships operating within 200 miles (321.9 km) of shore with the aim of significantly reducing emissions by the year 2020. In a development that could play into these environmental initiatives, the SeaChange Group, a US-based start-up that converts agricultural by-products into clean-burning fuel, has been awarded a patent for an eco-hybrid fuel technology shown to reduce NOx, particulate matter and greenhouse gas emissions. Read More
— Marine

Make it so: VTT and Rolls-Royce imagine the ship's bridge of 2025

By - March 17, 2014 9 Pictures
Horatio Hornblower meets Jean-Luc Picard on the ship’s bridge of 2025 as Finnish applied research organization VTT and Rolls-Royce present their vision of seafaring ten years from now. Presented in 3D animation videos that projects current technology to the near future, the study shows a world where ship captains call on heads-up displays and high-tech workstations turn the bridge into an augmented reality command and control system. Read More
— Marine

New ship will remain stable by creating its own inner waves

By - September 5, 2013 2 Pictures
When offshore oil drilling rigs are being installed, serviced or dismantled, the workers typically stay in cabins located on adjacent floating platforms. These semi-submersible platforms are towed into place (or travel under their own power) and then their hulls are partially filled with water, allowing them to remain somewhat stable in the pitching seas. Now, a ship is being built to serve the same purpose, but that will be a much more mobile alternative. It will keep from rolling with the waves by generating its own waves, inside its hull. Read More
— Marine

Radical new icebreaker will travel through the ice sideways

By - August 2, 2013 3 Pictures
Given that icebreakers clear a path for other ships by traveling through the ice head-on (or sometimes butt-on), then in order for one of them to clear a wider path, it would have to be wider and thus larger overall ... right? Well, Finland’s Arctech Helsinki Shipyard is taking a different, more efficient approach. It’s in the process of building an asymmetric-hulled icebreaker that can increase its frontal area, by making its way through the ice at an angle of up to 30 degrees. Read More
— Environment

DIFIS funnels up oil spills

By - July 9, 2013 4 Pictures
When ships sink, as well as the loss of property (and very possibly life), there’s the danger of environmental damage. An oil tanker breaking up is a disaster, but even a cargo ship going down can mean oil leaking from fuel bunkers. Double Inverted Funnel for Intervention on Shipwrecks (DIFIS) is an EU project coordinated by Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) that uses a passive system to catch oil as it leaks out of a wreck on the ocean floor. Read More
— Marine

New tech could allow for more eco-friendly barnacle control on boats

By - July 5, 2013 1 Picture
Barnacles may look nice and nautical on things like rocks, but they’re a major problem for watercraft of all sorts. On the hulls of ships, for example, they can drastically decrease the vessel’s hydrodynamics, causing it to burn more fuel and emit more emissions in order to maintain its cruising speed. The most common way of keeping barnacles off those hulls involves the use of environmentally-unfriendly paints. Now, however, a scientist from Sweden’s University of Gothenburg has developed what could be a less harmful alternative. Read More
— Architecture

Cruise terminal replaces Hong Kong's legendary Kai Tak Airport

By - June 16, 2013 11 Pictures
Flying into Hong Kong was once an aerial adventure as gigantic passenger planes made alarmingly steep descents over the harbor and then low over crowded high rises to runway 13. Those adrenalin-filled landings ended when the new Hong Kong International Airport to the west opened in 1998, however, the site of those dramatic flights has now been repurposed as the new Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. It was formally opened on June 12 as the Commissioner for Tourism, Mr Philip Yung, welcomed the inaugural berthing of the cruise ship Mariner of the Seas. Read More
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