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— Science

Laser tech allows for longer-distance sensing

The trouble with existing 3D imaging technology is that – at the consumer level, at least – it tends to struggle with distances beyond a few feet. Put even a third of the width of a basketball court between yourself and a Microsoft Kinect sensor, for instance, and it won't pick up your movements at all. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, claim to have developed a Lidar (light radar)-based system that can remotely sense objects across distances as long as 30 feet (10 m), which could have widespread benefits in fields as diverse as entertainment, transportation, robotics, and mobile phones. Read More
— Robotics

One oven-baked robot to go, please

Lots of people make their own robots, and in all sorts of ways, but have you ever heard of anyone baking one in an oven? Researchers at MIT have demonstrated how to create self-assembling bodies that fold together when baked, as well as showing how a similar technique can be used to generate electronic components to control them. Read More
— Sports

Adidas miCoach Smart Ball tracks your striking power and finesse

It was back in 2007 that Adidas first explored the potential of an intelligent football. In the time since, it has continued to smarten up sports performance with heart-monitoring phones, fitness tracking watches and intelligent football boots. Now, just as the globe turns its focus to next month's World Cup in Brazil, it has unveiled the miCoach Smart Ball, a soccer ball with built-in sensors to track everything from the power of your strike to the finesse of your free kick. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

OMSignal's Biometric Smartwear offers a next gen workout

OMsignal has announced its new line of biometric smartwear, a fitness focused smart shirt with the ability to accurately track an individual's performance levels and vital stats in real time, giving users all the information they need to be fully in control of their workout. The smart shirt, which is currently only available for pre-order to male customers, represents another addition to the ever expanding market of health orientated wearable tech. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Stretchy, health monitoring skin patch uses off-the-shelf components

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University is developing a stick-on patch that makes health monitoring more flexible and practical. Building on previous work, the latest design replaces custom-made components with off-the-shelf, chip-based electronics to deliver a soft, tattoo-like epidermal electronic system for wireless health monitoring. Read More