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Self-Driving

Automotive

Navya Arma: A glimpse into the boring, utilitarian self-driving future

This autonomous French shuttle bus is already on sale, and deployed on a number of geofenced sites including a 220-hectare EDF power plant in Civaux. Fully electric and capable of operating like a set-route bus or an on-demand taxi, the Navya Arma carries 15 people at a top speed up to 45 km/h. It's also undergoing road testing. Efficient, useful, slow and unexciting, it's much like what we can expect when self-driving cars hit the roads en masse.Read More

Automotive

Greenwich opens autonomous driving trials up to the public

As the world's automakers push to have their self-driving cars ready for widespread adoption, trials are popping up everywhere from China to the UK. Greenwich is the latest area to open itself up to self-driving car trials, but is letting the general public get in on the act in an attempt to find out how they feel about ceding control to a car.Read More

Automotive

BMW says self-driving i NEXT will be available in 2021

From Audi to Volvo, the world's automakers are pushing hard to have their autonomous cars ready for general consumption, but BMW's CEO has just given one of the clearest indications yet of when we can first expect to give up the steering wheel. Speaking at a shareholder meeting this week, Harald Kr├╝ger said the Bavarian giant would have an autonomous vehicle called the i NEXT on the road by 2021. Read More

Singapore hails driverless taxis

Autonomous car software designer nuTonomy is looking to bring driverless taxis to the streets of Singapore. Following successful obstacle course tests, the company is in the process of seeking government approval to test its driverless technology on roads in the OneNorth business district, with plans to eventually offer the service at a cost comparable with public transport.Read More

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