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Security

Frameblock turns a bike into its own lock

Carrying a bike lock while cycling can be a hassle, which is why some companies have started developing built-in locks. One of the latest, the Frameblock, is actually part of the frame. That way, if a thief cuts through it, they're left with a damaged bike that they won't want ... a fact that they'll hopefully realize before cutting it. Read More

Bicycles

Ulock jumps into the wireless bike lock marketplace

Over the past couple of years, we've heard about two different bicycle U-locks – the Skylock and the BitLock – that can be unlocked via the user's smartphone. Both were the subject of successful crowd-funding campaigns, and both are now available for pre-order. When it comes to a product that's actually being shipped to buyers now, however, the imaginatively-named Ulock has just beaten them both to it. Read More

Around The Home

Grande Infinity combines watch safe with precision pendulum clock

Do you want a moderne-style grandfather clock and a high-tech watch display with built-in winder safe, but don't have room for both? Then consider the Grande Infinity from upmarket safe makers Buben & Zorweg. The German-designed and built Grande Infinity was created in cooperation with clock maker Erwin Sattler and watch mover manufacturer Elma and combines a precision pendulum-movement clock with a state-of-the-art display case and safe.Read More

Telecommunications

Uber's Android app caught reporting data back without permission

Security researcher GironSec has pulled Uber's Android app apart and discovered that it's sending a huge amount of personal data back to base – including your call logs, what apps you've got installed, whether your phone is vulnerable to certain malware, whether your phone is rooted, and your SMS and MMS logs, which it explicitly doesn't have permission to do. It's the latest in a series of big-time missteps for a company whose core business model is, frankly, illegal in most of its markets as well.Read More

Military

Nuclear weapons write their own security codes

Nuclear weapons are a paradox. No one in their right mind wants to use one, but if they're to act as a deterrent, they need to be accessible. The trick is to make sure that access is only available to those with the proper authority. To prevent a real life General Jack D Ripper from starting World War III, Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division is developing a system that uses a nuclear weapon's own radiation to protect itself from tampering.Read More

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