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Security

Drones

Anti-UAV Defense System uses radio beam to disable drones

Sophisticated, easy to fly drones are everywhere these days and like most new technologies, they have the potential for mischievous or malicious applications as well as positive ones. It follows that there's an increasing demand for improved surveillance and countermeasures specifically tailored for this type of aircraft. Billed as the world's first fully integrated system designed to detect, track and disrupt small and large drones, the Anti-UAV Defence System (AUDS) from Blighter Surveillance Systems uses radio beams to freeze drones in midair by interfering with their control channels.
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Around The Home

Angee automated home security system doubles as a personal assistant

The relentless march of technology has helped make home security systems a more affordable option for homeowners, while the ubiquity of home wireless networks has helped extend their capabilities and ease of use. San Francisco-based startup Angee Inc. is looking to take things a bit further by adding some computer smarts to create an automated security system that is portable and doubles as a personal assistant.Read More

Around The Home

Myfox security camera keeps watch on your home, respects your privacy

If you only want your home security camera to keep vigil on your home while you're away, and not watch you while you're there, you could just disable it when you walk through the door. But there's always a danger of forgetting to turn it back on before you go out again. The Myfox Security Camera features a mechanical privacy shutter that can be opened or closed remotely using an app running on an iOS or Android smartphone. Read More

Automotive

DEF CON focuses on vehicle security and beyond in wake of Jeep hack

Last month, security researchers Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller made headlines when they remotely hacked a Jeep Cherokee, killing the transmission as a Wired reporter drove at high-speed down the freeway. But with cars representing only a subset of the Internet of Things, it's likely that many companies that had previously never considered whether their products were virtually as well as physically safe will similarly be responding to disclosures of exploits and courting future employees at hacker conventions in the future. Security researchers at DEF CON described the many attack surfaces of today's connected vehicle and pointed to potential improvements to protect consumers.Read More

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