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Security


— Around The Home

Grande Infinity combines watch safe with precision pendulum clock

By - December 2, 2014 4 Pictures
Do you want a moderne-style grandfather clock and a high-tech watch display with built-in winder safe, but don't have room for both? Then consider the Grande Infinity from upmarket safe makers Buben & Zorweg. The German-designed and built Grande Infinity was created in cooperation with clock maker Erwin Sattler and watch mover manufacturer Elma and combines a precision pendulum-movement clock with a state-of-the-art display case and safe. Read More
— Telecommunications

Uber's Android app caught reporting data back without permission

By - November 26, 2014 1 Picture
Security researcher GironSec has pulled Uber's Android app apart and discovered that it's sending a huge amount of personal data back to base – including your call logs, what apps you've got installed, whether your phone is vulnerable to certain malware, whether your phone is rooted, and your SMS and MMS logs, which it explicitly doesn't have permission to do. It's the latest in a series of big-time missteps for a company whose core business model is, frankly, illegal in most of its markets as well. Read More
— Military

Nuclear weapons write their own security codes

By - November 24, 2014 1 Picture
Nuclear weapons are a paradox. No one in their right mind wants to use one, but if they're to act as a deterrent, they need to be accessible. The trick is to make sure that access is only available to those with the proper authority. To prevent a real life General Jack D Ripper from starting World War III, Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division is developing a system that uses a nuclear weapon's own radiation to protect itself from tampering. Read More
— Electronics

QR codes could generate 3D images on phones – no internet required

By - November 14, 2014 3 Pictures
Whether they're on product packaging, promotional materials or in magazines, most QR codes do the same thing – when a smartphone scans them with its camera, they trigger that phone's web browser to navigate to a given website. In the near future, however, they may be used to securely display 3D images on the user's phone, without even involving the often-untrustworthy internet. Read More
— Science

Carbon nanotubes could find use in improved bomb detection device

By - November 10, 2014 2 Pictures
Along with flame-retardant clothing, flexible supercapitors and a stronger alternative to carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes may soon have yet another application. Led by Prof. Ling Zang, a team of researchers at the University of Utah has integrated the tiny tubes of carbon atoms into a prototype explosives sensor. It can also detect illegal drugs and toxic chemicals such as nerve gas, reportedly doing so better than currently-used technologies. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Experts call for risk scores to improve smartphone app security

By - October 30, 2014 1 Picture
Next time you download or update an app for your smartphone or tablet and blitz through messages asking for permissions approval, you may be unnecessarily exposing your personal information to possible cyber violation. Researchers suggest this issue could potentially be addressed through better consumer education and an easy to understand risk score for each app. Read More
— Military

Marine Armor System rolls down the blinds on pirates

By - October 28, 2014 9 Pictures
There are a number of systems out there designed to keep pirates from boarding ships, incorporating everything from lasers to acoustic devices to writhing water hoses. However, what happens if the pirates get on board anyway? If the ship is equipped with the Marine Armor System, a series of ballistic blinds will roll down throughout the vessel, blocking access to its interior. Read More
— Good Thinking

Wireless Yardarm Sensor monitors firearm use in real time

By - October 26, 2014 7 Pictures
Anytime a police officer draws their weapon, it's likely to be a tense, confusing situation where split second decisions can be the difference between life and death. In an attempt to reduce some of the confusion, Yardarm has developed a wireless sensor that allows firearms to be tracked and monitored in real time thanks to a small electronics package that fits into the weapon's grip. Read More
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