Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Security

The Lazer Cappuccino locks the quick release buckle of a helmet strap

It's not uncommon for recreational cyclists to stop at a sidewalk cafe after a long ride, and sit outside near their bike while sipping their drink. While such situations don't necessarily call for a high-security lock, it still helps to have something that keeps thieves from just grabbing the bike and running with it. That's precisely what the Lazer Cappuccino helmet lock is intended to do.  Read More

The Yerka Project is an attempt to create the 'world's first unstealable bike'

Billed as the "world's first unstealable bike," the Yerka Project is the work of three engineering students from Chile who have figured out how to make the lock an integral part of the frame.  Read More

The X5 Security Plus is rated to VR6 for ballistic protection

Earlier this month, Mercedes revealed its S600 Guard armored car. BMW has now followed suit by using Moscow’s International Auto Salon to launch the new X5 Security Plus, an armored version of the X5 SUV designed to protect customers against "violent assault, kidnapping and organized crime."  Read More

The 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Performance Data Recorder gets a new Valet Mode

General Motors has announced that the 2015 Chevrolet Corvette will get a new Valet Mode for its Performance Data Recorder, which will allow owners to disable the infotainment system, lock any interior storage and record vehicle data – giving drivers peace of mind when their car is with a valet.  Read More

The Noke unlocks in response to a user-specific Bluetooth signal

There are already door locks and bicycle U-locks that are activated by Bluetooth, but Utah-based FŪZ Designs claims that its Noke is the world's first Bluetooth padlock. Like its house- and bike-specific counterparts, the Noke forgoes a physical key or combination dial, and instead unlocks when it detects the Bluetooth signal from an approved user's smartphone.  Read More

Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon are developing a programming language that seamless...

The web would be a much more secure place if not for the vulnerability built right into a common coding practice: pasted-together strings of database commands (usually for either SQL queries or JavaScript-enabled user interactions), which could be exploited for malicious purposes. But computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon are developing a programming language specifically intended to protect computers and websites from such threats.  Read More

For those who want to be seen, flags and flashing lights are optional

Feeling a little paranoid about attacks from all of those pesky challengers to your authority? Perhaps you just crave a bit of extra security in your limousine? Well, Mercedes may just have the answer for you, in the form of its S600 Guard.  Read More

Tallac Design's Vier lock

There's little doubt that bicycle thieves are deterred more by U-locks than by cable locks. The form factor of U-locks, however, can make them awkward to transport. That's why California cyclists Allen and Paige Young have created the Vier lock. It's designed to offer the security of a U, but it disassembles into a package "the size of a burrito" when not in use.  Read More

'Network coding' could make the internet faster and more secure (Image: Shutterstock)

Researchers at Aalborg University, MIT and Caltech have developed a new mathematically-based technique that can boost internet data speeds by up to 10 times, by making the nodes of a network much smarter and more adaptable. The advance also vastly improves the security of data transmissions, and could find its way into 5G mobile networks, satellite communications and the Internet of Things.  Read More

Google has announced a new and well-staffed team tasked with finding software vulnerabilit...

When the Heartbleed security flaw was detected earlier this year, it was estimated that two-thirds of the world's servers were vulnerable to attack. Flaws such as this, that exist before they are detected, are known as "zero day" flaws. Now, Google has set up a team to combat them.  Read More

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