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Safety


— Military

World's first military blast test dummy to join the US Army

By - April 11, 2015 3 Pictures
For something commonly called a "dummy," the mannequins used in crash tests are surprisingly sophisticated and so specialized that they're not much use out of automotive safety labs. When the US Army went looking for a dummy of its own, it had to go back to square one by awarding a contract to California-based Diversified Technical Systems (DTS) to help develop the first instrumented dummy designed for military vehicle blast testing. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Wearable collision warning device for the visually-impaired

By - March 29, 2015
For people with reduced vision, getting around safely without walking into obstacles can be tricky. Those with decent central vision but whose peripheral sight is fading or lost are particularly at risk because they aren't conditioned to be alert for oncoming dangers they can't see. But a new pocket-sized device that sits on a person's chest may make walking much safer for these people and others with visual impairments by warning of impending collisions. Read More
— Motorcycles Review

Three ways the 2015 BMW S1000RR just saved my butt

By - March 18, 2015 18 Pictures
The first edition S1000RR superbike saved my butt (and my passenger's) in a big way back in 2011, when this spectacular bit of video captured the moment a wide-running pickup ran me off the road and onto the gravel. It's only fair that we give the 2015 version the opportunity to save my butt as well, although perhaps this time with a larger safety margin. So we lined up an S1000RR at Philip Island, one of the world's fastest racetracks, and I went out and rode it as fast as I dared. And as impressive as the performance of this 199-horsepower monster is, even more impressive was the way its ingenious safety and ride assist systems prevented me from making a fool and a bum-up lawn ornament out of myself, time and time again. Read More
— Science

New boot sole rubber uses glass to grip on ice

By - March 18, 2015 2 Pictures
At this time of year, people living in northern regions all over the world are faced with the same problem: icy sidewalks. Boots with otherwise grippy soles still slip, and spikes don't do well on stretches where there is no ice. Researchers from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the University of Toronto are developing what could be a better alternative, however – rubber soles with bits of glass embedded in them. Read More
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