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Safety

Ducati's Multistrada D-Air, with wireless airbag jackets.

Ducati has announced a new version of its stunning Multistrada 1200 sports-tourer (check out our video review) that wirelessly inflates airbag jackets for both rider and passenger in the event of a crash. A step forward from the motorcycle airbag Honda showcased in its Goldwing series, the Ducati system can protect the rider and passenger even once they’ve separated from the bike.  Read More

Real-time data about slippery patches on the road is used to warn nearby vehicles nearby

Volvo has a history of shaping many safety features we take for granted today, regardless of what brand of car we drive. From the first introduction of the safety cage in 1944 and pioneering laminated windshields that same year, Volvo has always prided itself as a safety trailblazer. Now the Swedish automotive company is further developing its cloud-based infotainment system as part of a safety-focused pilot project.  Read More

The Lumen Retro-Reflective City Bicycle from San Francisco's Mission Bicycle Company

Pimping your person and your ride with reflective materials, bright lighting or glow-in-the-dark paint jobs to be as visible as possible to motorists at night can mean the difference between getting home safely or saying hello to a world of pain ... or worse. Inspired by passing highly-reflective street signs during daily rides and wondering why such technology couldn't be applied directly to bikes, the folks at San Francisco's Mission Bicycle Company have developed Lumen. During daylight hours, the city bike looks pretty much like any other, but when night draws in, light from car headlights hitting the city bike's retro-reflective frame and wheel rims is returned directly back to its source.  Read More

Volvo Driver State Estimation uses a dash-mounted infrared sensor

Back in the days of black-and-white newsreels, an inventor came up with a bell on a collar that rang whenever a motorist wearing it nodded off. Since this is the 21st century, Volvo is developing a high-tech version of this gadget. It uses face recognition technology to let a car know when the driver is tired or inattentive, so appropriate action can be taken.  Read More

The Pedestrian SCOOT system follows on from TfL's Pedestrian Countdown program (Image: TfL...

Ever walk halfway across a road only to have the light change and force you to make an undignified rush to the other side? The answer is almost certainly yes. If you’re in London, that may soon be a thing of the past however, with Transport for London announcing upcoming trials of an "intelligent" pedestrian crossing. Called the Pedestrian Split Cycle Offset Optimisation Technique (SCOOT), it’s part of a £2 billion to £4 billion program to improve roads over the next ten years and decrease traffic fatalities in the capital by 40 percent by the year 2020.  Read More

The Revolights Arc knows how fast you're going, and shines accordingly

Revolights is a bicycle lighting system that first came to our attention three years ago, in which the front of the front wheel lights up to serve as a headlight, while the back of the rear wheel illuminates to act as a tail light. While it's a clever setup, at US$229 for a full kit, it's not cheap. That's why its designers have just announced a more affordable alternative called the Revolights Arc, that combines a tail light and wheel-speed-activated brake light.  Read More

One Llama's new app aims to make walking down the street with headphones safer Photo: Kuma...

Let's be honest, walking around in a busy city with loud music blasting through a pair of headphones is not a safe thing to do. Still, that doesn't stop people from doing it every day. A startup called One Llama has just announced a new application that's designed to make that activity a little less dangerous. It constantly listens to background noise, and when it hears something that the user needs to know about, such as a car horn, it automatically mutes the music and alerts them. At least, that's the promise.  Read More

Dainese says the D-air does not affect the skier's aerodynamics

We've been following the development of the Dainese D-Air Ski for just over three years, and the company has now revealed a near-competition-ready prototype to the world. Using a clever array of sensors, the protective ski garment detects a crash and rapidly inflates around the skier's upper body to protect from injury on the way down.  Read More

Cuff has launched a new range of wearable technology

Although the functionality of wearable technology may be beginning to measure up to expectations, its aesthetic form has largely been derided, and designers face the task of bridging the tech and fashion worlds. Cuff is one of a number of fledgling companies that is looking to reconcile technological prowess with head-turning looks. Its newly-launched range of fashion accessories incorporate a discrete wireless device that, when pressed, sends a notification to your chosen contacts to let them know you're trying to make contact.  Read More

VTTI researchers demonstrate connected-vehicle technology on the Northern Virginia Connect...

An important element to the notion of self-driving cars is that they are able to communicate between each other and surrounding infrastructure. While automotive manufacturers have begun to explore this technology and even banded together to hasten its emergence, the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute has been quietly working toward a similar goal. With the an award of US$1 million in funding courtesy of the US Department of Transportation, its researchers hope to develop a framework to facilitate a safe future for autonomous vehicles.  Read More

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