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— Sports

BSXinsight lactate threshold sensor lets athletes know how far to push themselves

Whether they're training or taking part in actual competitions, athletes have to maintain a delicate balance – they want to make sure that they're "giving it everything they've got," yet they don't want to push themselves to the point that they cramp up or drop from exhaustion. That's why the BSXinsight was created. Billed as being the world's first wearable lactate threshold sensor, it's made to let athletes know how close they're getting to the edge, so they can approach it but not go over. Read More
— Outdoors

Modular Offpiste takes triangular approach to backpack design

Over the years, the backpack has evolved slowly. It's gained new and improved features, but it's remained essentially the same: a dual-strapped sack. But a host of more substantial backpack redesigns over recent years, such as multifunctional jacket backpacks and restructured strap systems, suggest that evolution might be accelerating. The Offpiste UltraPack leaps forward a few evolutionary stages, strapping a gear-hauling triangle to your torso via a single strap for new-found athleticism. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

runScribe wants to hitch a ride on your shoe to analyze your run

From the Jawbone Up24 to the Samsung Gear Fit, there is a wide range of fitness trackers on store shelves. So if a new piece of technology wants to stand out, it has to offer something above and beyond what’s out there in the wild. Kickstarter project runScribe aims to do just that, providing runners with an unparalleled level of data by accurately tracking the movement of their feet during the gait cycle. Read More

LightSpur enlightens your heels

Anyone who runs or cycles after the sun goes down will tell ya, it's vitally important to make sure that you're visible to motorists. Nathan's LightSpur is one of the latest products designed to provide you with that visibility, and it looks like it draws equal inspiration from Tron and A Fistful of Dollars. Read More
— Sports

Smart shoe to improve jogging technique on the run

Given its accessibility to anyone with two feet, jogging is one of the most popular forms of fitness activity around the world, with around 10 million people in Germany alone donning their running shoes and hitting the pavement on a regular basis, according to the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems (IPMS). However, this popularity also translates into a large number of jogging-related injuries. In an effort to reduce the number of injuries, a research team from IPMS is developing a high-tech running shoe with the ability to evaluate a jogger's running form and technique in real-time. Read More