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Robotics

— Robotics

Bio-likeness: Getting the feel of our robotic future

By - July 28, 2014 21 Pictures
Robots will form a big part of our lives in the future, but despite the imagination and foresight of the best science fiction writers and filmmakers, it's still not exactly clear how will we accept and interact with them. Researchers at the Yamanaka Laboratory at the University of Tokyo have been investigating the field of robot-human interaction since 2007 by adding different kinds of biological behavior to a series of robotic sculptures. Recently almost all of these sculptures were gathered together for the Bio-likeness prototype exhibition. Gizmag went along to get a feel of their work. Read More
— Robotics

MIT researchers augment humans with extra robotic arms

Featured in comic books since 1963, Dr. Octopus, or "Doc Ock" is an enemy of Spiderman with four extra robotic arms attached to his back that assist him in his nefarious plans. That vision of humans with extra limbs – minus the supervillain part – is taking shape at MIT with researchers adding "supernumerary robotic arms" to assist with tasks that ordinary two-armed humans would find difficult. Read More
— Robotics

"Ladybird" autonomous robot to help out down on the farm

By - July 2, 2014 1 Picture
Ladybirds are happily welcomed by gardeners into their yards, knowing that they will consume the most prolific plant pests like white flies, mites, and aphids. Imagine, then, how useful an autonomous, solar-powered, intelligent robotic ladybird could be on a farm. Enter the University of Sydney’s "Ladybird," not actually an eater of insect pests, but a robot capable of conducting mobile farm reconnaissance, mapping, classification, and detection of problems for a variety of different crops. Read More
— Robotics

Crowdsourcing could help robots learn new tasks faster

By - June 29, 2014 3 Pictures
If robots are going to work alongside humans, the machines are going to need to swallow their pride and learn to ask for help. At least, that’s the thinking of computer scientists at the University of Washington (UW), who are working on ways for robots to crowdsource their problems when learning new tasks. If successful, this approach points the way toward future robots that are capable of asking for assistance to speed up their learning when it comes to figuring out how to carry out household tasks. Read More
— Robotics

"Tell me Dave" robot learns simply by people talking to it

By - June 24, 2014 2 Pictures
Many robots today are able to follow verbal instructions. However, the robot first has to be programmed with software code that allows it to respond to those instructions in some predetermined way, and that software must be added to every time the robot's task list is enhanced. Wouldn’t it be easier if we could just avoid all that messy fiddling about with software and talk to a machine as we would a human and explain what we wanted it to do? Researchers at Cornell University thought so, that’s why they designed and built a learning robot as part of their "Tell me Dave" project. Read More
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