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— Digital Cameras

Minox reveals its latest miniaturized retro-style digital camera

Minox has revealed the latest version of its miniaturized digital classic camera, the Minox DCC 14.0. The tiny camera – which is made to a scale of 1:3 and can fit in the palm of your hand – features a 14-megapixel sensor, a fixed lens and an optical viewfinder. But users shouldn't expect image quality to rival higher-end (and considerably larger) retro-shooters like the Fujifilm X100S. Read More
— Motorcycles

A clean-sheet V-Twin engine for the new 2014 Indian Motorcycles line

Indian Motorcycles has once again risen from the dustbin of history. Purchased by Polaris Industries in 2011, the 2014 model year involves a complete redesign of the Indian motorcycle line. The most notable new feature is the new Thunder Stroke 111 V-Twin engine. A fresh design from the ground up, the design goals included keeping the classic Indian engine look while implementing a 49 degree V-Twin geometry with modern technology. Read More
— Mobile Technology

"Searching for Sugar Man" becomes first movie partly shot with an iPhone to win an Oscar

Last night's Academy Awards marked a number of achievements in film history, but there was one noteworthy accomplishment that wasn't mentioned on stage. While many people were focused on the high-profile Best Picture nominees and Hollywood stars, the low-budget film Searching for Sugar Man received the award for Best Documentary. Aside from earning plenty of acclaim for its director, Malik Bendjelloul, the film also became a technological milestone as the first movie partially shot with an iPhone to win an Oscar. Read More
— Outdoors

Bowlus Road Chief updates 1930s classic caravan

Caravans make a nice change from holidays in hotels, but they can be as aerodynamic as a shoe box and often about as attractive. Canadian tech entrepreneurs John Long and Helena Mitchell are taking a step forward by going a step backward and reviving the Bowlus Road Chief of the 1930s. It’s an updated version of the classic American design that they call a “revival of an Art Moderne style with 21st century touches.” Read More
— Games

Giant NES controller made from LEGO actually works

For fans of retro games there's nothing better than sitting down, controller in hand, with a classic title loading on the screen in front of you ... except perhaps for sitting down in front of a huge controller made out of LEGO. Which fully works. Yes, that would do it. Thanks to the hard work of one Baron von Brunk, Nintendo fans who never lost their love of the original NES can now see their dreams fulfilled. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

"Loading..." watch concept will keep you waiting forever

Loading screens are never a welcome sight, whether they're interrupting a video game or informing you just how long you have to wait for a new program to download and install. Imagine having one permanently displayed on your wrist; one that never actually reached 100 percent. You could do, if this particular Tokyo Flash concept design gets turned into a real wristwatch. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Lomography scanner uses your smartphone to digitize analog slides and negatives

If you were into photography in the 80s or earlier, chances are that you now have a bunch of slides and negatives that have sat forgotten for many years. Should that be the case, or if you even still use analog film, then the Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner might be for you. It allows you to convert 35mm negs and slides into digital images, using your smartphone. Read More
— 3D Printing

Digital audio files converted into 3D-printable records

Like many music lovers today, I have a huge digital library and even though I've now converted much of my vinyl collection to MP3, I still return to my racks often. I've not really considered the possibility of converting my MP3/OGG/FLAC files into 12-inch records ... until now. While exploring the limits of today's 3D-printing technology, digital music tinkerer Amanda Ghassaei has come up with a technique for converting digital audio files of virtually any format into 3D-printed, 33.3 RPM records that can be played on any ordinary turntable. Read More